Jump to content

Fly fish vs spinning


Norm M
 Share

Recommended Posts

I readily admit that I don't know much about flyfishing . From my observations fishing along side those that do flyfish it is obvious that they have an advantage in being able to hit a spot again quicker than I can . It seems me me though that I have an advantage in that I can cover the different parts of the water column more efficiently than they can .

 

Any thoughts on this would be appreciated especially from anyone who is adept at both .

Link to comment
Share on other sites

two advantages fly anglers have is 1 a quietier landing that doesnt spookthe fish as muchand second is that they dont spend alot of time reeling the line all theway in on each cast. they can land the fly , work it 5-10ft then , get it out there again with no reelin. spin casters have an advantage if alot of ocverhangng trees are in the background . they would spend less time getting fly out of the branches . also pitching a bait into falldowns is hard on a fly angler rich

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Being inept of the fly fishing craft - I hope only to be able to tie beautiful flies one day for others to cast.

It must me a retarded gene in me or something similar to my baseball/hockey/golf cross-over problems.

Can't maintain any type of consistency w/ the golf swing either!

 

Maybe I just need the right kind of teachers, more patience (learning from my children 7 & 6 yrs old), and an armored suit for said

teacher!

 

Keep a tight line y'all!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Guest One More Cast

Norm,

 

I have never thought of this as a versus thing.

 

Fly Fishers are not "better" or "superior" they are just different. I fly fish simply because I enjoy it. I have outfished hardware guys and have been out fished by hardware guys and have had a grand time either way.

 

There are things I can do with a fly rod that you cannot do with a spinning rod and you can do things with a spinning rod that I can't. My way is not "better" than yours.

 

I will tell you this: Spinning rod Smallmouth anglers make great fly rodders and can master my sport much more quickly than novices.

 

Consider coming to one of the free casting events that are offered though the ISA, give it a shot and get some instruction...it really pays off.

 

Joseph

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Sounds like a new challenge, Norm! What's left for you? Do it. B)

 

 

 

Rich- 'Spincasting' is technically push button reels like Zebco 202. Proper terms would be gear dude, spinning reel, plug chucker, tube dragger, bait drowner, buzz knocker, jig flipper, jerk-jerker, grub thrower, etc/all... ;)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

In addition, baitcasting versus spinning. 90 mph fast ball versus little league. In yo' FACE!!!

For 25 years I did both sometimes spinfishing to locate fish and than switching until I gave all my spin gear to my brother 15 years ago hoping his 2 boys would take up the sport as they became older which alas didn't happen as like so many kids today they developed no connection to the outdoors.While I know that in general spinning gear will most often catch more fish at least for warmwater species I also know that those who put forth the time and effort to become good flyfishermen[and make no mistake it does take more time and effort than spinfishing demands]will most often find that they would rather catch 2 flyfishing than twice that spinning not because they've become flyfishing snobs but because they find flyfishing more challenging and more importantly more FUN.Even you might,Eric.By the way if you'd ever watched the little league playoffs you'd know that a fastball at 75mph reaches the hitter as fast as a 90+mph in the majors due to the mound's being closer.

All I've said so far applies to fishing for warmwater species.When it comes to trout/salmon fishing spinning is definitely minor league compared to the challenge and intricacies of flyfishing which can require using gossamer leaders and casting flies the size of mosquitoes.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I readily admit that I don't know much about flyfishing . From my observations fishing along side those that do flyfish it is obvious that they have an advantage in being able to hit a spot again quicker than I can . It seems me me though that I have an advantage in that I can cover the different parts of the water column more efficiently than they can .

 

Any thoughts on this would be appreciated especially from anyone who is adept at both .

 

Norm,

I can answer your question depending on your definition of "adept". I'm good enough at flycasting to catch a fish here and there and smart enough to know that I could be better and catch more fish if I practiced and became a better caster.

To be proficient enough at flyfishing to be more effective than spinning you have to be a good flycaster. That requires requires practice and skill. Something not everybody has time for.

I think in most cases conventional tackle is more effective (defined as: catching more and bigger fish, under different circumstances) for most people.

I've played around with sink tip heads in deeper water, it wasn't fun. So yes, you could probably cver the watercolumn better. Plus take in variety of baits (not mention live) that you could throw with conventional tackle.

That said, I'd rather catch one on the fly than five any other way.

 

Mark

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Joeseph ,

 

I really don't think that one way or the other is superior , just different as you say . It was just a way to phrase the question .

 

If my life ever gets back to normal , I may look into the lessons .

 

 

Mike ,

 

My wife said she gets 75% of the action from any video . You better have a tripod as I believe it's hard to focus a camera while rolling on the ground and laughing so hard it brings tears to your eyes .

Link to comment
Share on other sites

My wife said she gets 75% of the action from any video . You better have a tripod as I believe it's hard to focus a camera while rolling on the ground and laughing so hard it brings tears to your eyes .

 

:P

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I readily admit that I don't know much about flyfishing . From my observations fishing along side those that do flyfish it is obvious that they have an advantage in being able to hit a spot again quicker than I can . It seems me me though that I have an advantage in that I can cover the different parts of the water column more efficiently than they can .

 

Any thoughts on this would be appreciated especially from anyone who is adept at both .

 

Many fine points have been made here. Though fly casting has the advantage of keeping the fly "in the zone" when fish are tight to cover, my experience is that spinning and bait casting are much easier to learn, more efficient controling depth-speed-size, and finally more economical. Consider that 150 yards of premium braid spinning or casting line costs $15.00 or 10 cents a yard while a premium Fly Line (90 feet or 30 yards) costs $60 or $2.00 a yard. Pursuing these lines of thought leads quickly to the question,"Why would anyone fly fish?" It is harder to learn, less efficient, and more expensive.

 

So why do I fly fish? The answer is not in the gear. I like to make a comparison to bow hunting for deer. A Remington with a 7X scope will, other things being equal, get your a bigger buck earlier in the season. Yet there are bowhunters. It has to do with sportsmanship and taking on the challenge of learning to use a bow, I think. Those items are in the hunter.

 

I like this quote since it helps me order my thoughts on the importance of numbers, size, and challenge:

 

"The ancients wrote of the three ages of man,

I propose to write of the three ages of the fisherman.

 

When he wants to catch all the fish he can.

When he strives to catch the largest fish.

When he studies to catch the most difficult fish he can find,

requiring the greatest skill and most refined tackle,

caring more for the sport than the fish."

 

Edward R. Hewitt "A Trout And Salmon Fisherman For Seventy-Five Years"

 

He was a fly fisherman. But note that he does not mention fly fishing. Fly fishing is not a proud or snobish, IMHO, because fly fishing naturally provides me with ample opportunities to practice humility when I finish the day with a sore arm having caught few fish.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Norm,

Let me say this. I do both There are times where spinning ahs it advantages and time the the flyrod excells. I find the flyrod excells in the cold water of early to mid-winter when I can best present natural imitations.

 

Likewise the "dog days" of summer when the water is hot, aquatic & terrestrial life in abundant, and the smallie is looking for the cool place to be.

 

Spinning is great in the fast and stained flows of spring, the thick canopy or stream cover, deep reaches of a big hole, or the large or fast presentations of fall.

 

Also it is effective for the multiple finesse to wacky, plastic presentations possible.

 

Here are a couple examples. My best day in the summer was last July when I landed 64 smallies to 17" over a nine hour day. I was floating and wading with a flyrod on an 8 mile stretch of my local river.

 

My best spinning is always April/May or September/October. In May of 2006 my son and landed 48 smallies in a 5 mile reach of a local creek. It included 5 smallies over 17" and a musky. One addition smallie was also taken on a fly.

 

Its all about choices and presentation.

I love the fly when I want to slow down and fish. The spinning is good when its tough cover, levels or time frame.

 

I frequently carry both when working with a canoe or kayak. When afoot I commonly have pack rod, reel and small sample of presentation for the opposite primary gear.

 

Rick

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I couldn't resist... i feel the learning curve is much steeper with the long rod, especially if your talking Smallmouth. With so few folks chasing Smallies with the long rod... it can be tough putting it all togather!! So much of the flyfishing world is Trout stuff. Fun to watch but not really the parts i needed to put it all togather. Thus the challenge! I have never been challenged so much as i have been since i've taken up Smallies on the fly. I am thinking of going back to the spinning gear for the fall just for a change, and so my buddy will fish with me more often. Also thinking of doing the minnow/bobber thing this fall... Davis Creek here i come!!! :rolleyes:

Link to comment
Share on other sites

As someone who does both I'll weigh in(though I'm adept at neither). Fishing is great regardless of technique, you're right that fly gear is at an advantage from a repetitive target prospective but conventional(spin and b-cast) are at an advantage of keeping a bait(lure, fly..whatever) in the strike-zone longer. Both methods have line management issues but flyline management requires more attention. I've come to the conclusion that though you can catch loads of smallies and sometimes large ones with fly gear you will catch larger fish with conventional gear. I think that is the case because you can fish both deeper and bigger(bait size). I know loads of people say it's not about catching fish, for me it is. When I go fishing I want to catch fish, size and #s are directly proportional to the positive mood I leave with :P

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I've got to admit that this is a topic that frustrates me to no end. Joseph M has it right: why should there be a versus as in which one is better etc. One might as well ask French versus Italian cuisine.....or.....maple versus walnut wood furniture.....or.....blond vs brunette, I'll stop there. :P

 

I fish and enjoy both methods, but fly fishing is what I prefer. Why? Because I find it more taxing on my mind and body. For me, fly fishing is a greater challenge. When I spin fish, I can let my mind wander and I can socialize with my mates, talk and laugh. When I'm exploring new water, I generally spin fish because I can concentrate on wading more safely instead of fly line mending etc. When I fly fish, I'm generally alone, or maybe with other fly fishers. When I step in the water to fly fish, I don't want to chat much.

 

I don't feel that there are across-the-board absolutes in comparing the methods except for 2 items: gear and casting. I think fly gear is more intricate than spin gear. The line for example: you've got your backing, fly line, leader, and tippet. Which type of fly line, floating, sink-tip, intermediate, full-sink, all effect where in the water column you fish. Do you choose to underline, match, or overline the fly rod weight? Sublties make a huge difference here. Then there's the science behind leader construction, or you can just use a straight piece of mono. How about casting? The amount of time I dedicate to fly casting is huge. I don't spend any time on spin casting: I have never practiced my spin casting in the back yard or have read any articles on "mastering the spin cast." These things don't make one better than the other, just different. To sound completely nerdy....I love the physics involved in fly casting. Forget the Zen stuff, it's all about the physics.

 

One thing I think everyone will agree upon is that casting your lure/fly into a tree and getting it stuck is a bad thing.

 

By the way, it's Italian tonight...homemade ravioli.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I've only fly fished in my earlier fishing days. I did so only to be able to cast flies to big bluegills, though I did fish and catch creek smallies and rock bass as well. It kind of stopped there, though I have always been intrigued by the sport.

 

In most cases, I prefer to search and fish for active fish. I think fly fishing would slow me down in terms of covering lots of water, even if it was an area in which I was familiar. Michael, as you stated, when fishing new water, you concentrate on safety, which takes away your concentration from fly fishing. Makes sense to me that you would be able to focus more on fly fishing in areas you regularly fish versus searching new water safely and quickly. That would frustrate me. Plus, when I fish with Don, we never shut up. :lol:

 

Ravioli sounds good. What time is dinner???

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Plus, when I fish with Don, we never shut up. :lol:

 

Ravioli sounds good. What time is dinner???

 

Now I know why Michael doesn't want to fish with me when he has the fly rod.

 

Save me a plate ;)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Steve, you're right about the exploring new water being frustrating. The entire time I'm exploring I'm thinking in terms of how it'll be when I bring the fly gear. As much as I love to spin fish, I'm obsessed with fly fishing.

 

 

Now I know why Michael doesn't want to fish with me when he has the fly rod.

 

It is about time we fish again, it's been awhile. Hopefully, you have some new jokes. ;) Ever hear the one about the crazy gnat? :o Or on second though, I better leave it alone.

 

Sorry guys, no ravioli leftovers.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...
 Share

×
×
  • Create New...