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Rob G

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Everything posted by Rob G

  1. Tom, I have used some super glue on the shaft of the hook, all the way to the bend, and pressed in the mop in order to keep it held in place so its point of freedom is further back and not just tied in at the posterior point of the popper body (hidden by the flash) but I will sure try doing as you mentioned. Thanks for the tip.
  2. The 17'er below and a couple of his smaller buddies were fooled by the Mopper Popper today, a shame that his bigger buddies didn't play along but I was pretty fortunate to get anything on top, as our water is still higher, faster, and more stained than I would like for pitching poppers. Btw, that mop tail takes on water and forces the rear of the popper to sink causing the front face to pitch up which creates a pretty decent spray and pop on the twitch, more so than my normal lighter tailing materials. The bad thing is that it often gets fouled with the hook since it is so pliable when soaked. Maybe a small mono loop in the rear might help with that. Any ideas ?
  3. One of the better places for those slotted tungsten beads.... https://www.allenflyfishing.com/slotted-tungsten-beads/
  4. Colin, that fly tied in a size 8 or 10 would be a panfish killer for sure.
  5. Can you post a photo Colin ?
  6. Ahh, ok, now I understand. Generally with this particular type of popper, a wounded minnow imitation, (at least in my mind) I'm pretty active in retrieving it, pop once or twice and then wait only a moment or two and repeat. Other top water flies like my big black bug, I tend to dead drift for longer periods between small twitches.
  7. Bart, as in how ? Truth is, I've yet to fish it but my main concern will be how often the mop fouls with the hook.
  8. John, as with many of my carp flies, tied on a Mustad 3366 size 6. As you know, a cheap hook but plenty strong, unfortunately they often come with a poor point. I always spend some time with my files making sure it is wicked sharp before it goes into my fly box.
  9. I've used a lot of different flies to catch carp, often when I'm not targeting them but I have more confidence in Clouser's Swimming nymph and/or a small woolly bugger than anything else. This below is the one I often start out with as it mimics a small crayfish or swimming nymph. I also like the upward hook orientation as I think it's maybe better at grabbing that fleshy upper lip.
  10. A friend forwarded on to me this old advertisement for some Heddon Bass Bugs and so I thought I would try to somewhat replicate them. I found some cork bottle caps at an old small town hardware store and filed them to shape. I did cheat a little and instead of painting on the eyes, I used a pair of modern stick on eyes. Hope to give them a go here shortly.
  11. Ben, I like your double mop frog and may have to play around with that idea. Colin, I really like your Ghost fly, just lovely. Your fly tying skills have really improved over time. John, I've been out of town a lot the last couple months and all too often it was when the river conditions were ideal for wading. Now I'm home for a short period and we're getting several inches of rain this weekend which will blow everything out again. Poor timing. I did get out a couple days ago on a nearby stream which was really low and clear and put up some decent numbers of smallies but no size. I thought I would tear them up with a cicada imitation since I could still hear them along the river but was surprised how little interest I could raise. I did get a few grassies to come up and "mouth" my cicada but none inhaled.....very frustrating.
  12. Kreb's popper body, Mustad popper hook 33903 size 4, Ice Wing Fiber- Mother of Pearl. Now if I can only find the time to get on the river and see if it hunts.
  13. Yes, sparse wings add to the transparency of the fly and allow for better movement. Bob Clouser thought that transparency was one of the best traits of his minnow as he felt that many baitfish are almost translucent in water. Also I once heard Bob mention that he ties his own Clouser Minnows so sparse that he couldn't tie those in that same manner for his own fly shop because no one would buy them, even though he felt the really sparse ones were more effective .
  14. My opinion, for what little it's worth. To address what Mike said, full sinking lines are no fun to cast while sink tips are definitely a little easier because of less drag since less line beneath the surface. Now I rarely use a sink tip on rivers or streams, because I'm generally not fishing my fly more than 4ft deep and a weighted Clouser can easily get down to that even on a floating line. In theory it sounds good to carry a sinking line with you on a separate spool but as I move down a river, I'm often changing between a floating surface bug and a weighted streamer and I detest wanting to throw a surface bug only to have to change out not only my fly but the spool and reline the rod as well, only to possibly change back to a weighted streamer and/or spool in another 30 yards. So, the only time I use a sink tip line is when fishing ponds / lakes or when I'm bound and determined to use for longer periods a semi floating deer hair head fly such as a Zoo Cougar which has a hard time getting down lower than about 1-2 feet on it's own. Again, this works for me and the rivers that I like to fish, where as the Kish might be much deeper and faster and therefore make sinking lines far more advantageous.
  15. From the above site: Trout flies are always welcome. Dries - Elk Hair Caddis, Adams, Stimulators in Sizes 10-16 Nymphs - Prince, Pheasant Tail, Hare's Ear, Beadheaded in Sizes 10-16 Soft Hackles - Green, Orange, Red in Sizes 12-16 Terrestrials - Hoppers & Ants in all Sizes Patriot Flies - Red or Purple Pink Squirrels or Similar in Sizes 10-16 Tricos - All Stages and Sizes Streamers In the midwest some of our favorite species include: Trout, Large and Smallmouth Bass and Walleyes
  16. Terry, do you know what type of flies that they desire. I have donated before to one of the organizations listed above and they were specifically seeking trout and panfish flies. Btw, thank you for the heads up. Rob
  17. Thanks Mike, I'm sure I'll enjoy the new material. Have you tied some up already for show and tell ?
  18. Beautiful flies, the man does a nice job with deer hair. Like his bullet head or Thunder creek flies as well.
  19. Mark, I know our own John L. uses glass in heavier line weights for bass. I have a couple 4 wts. that I will occasionally use when fishing for bluegill, red ear, and crappie. Btw, the first fly rod that I as a young boy purchased for myself was a Fenwick Fenglass rod around 1971, an 8' 5 wt. paid for with my paper route money. It was so light weight compared to the heavy bamboo fly rod my father started me on. So wish I still had that rod.
  20. Those are excellent and will fool many a fish. Nice work John !
  21. I have a photo somewhere of my father from the early 30's as a young boy holding up one of those huge flat heads. Of course now, that area where they used to be able to stand so close to the dam and swing those large cane poles is all fenced off.
  22. John, my grandfather told me that they used to use long cane poles to swing large pieces of chicken like a leg and thigh below the dam which formed Lake Decatur. They would allow the under current to tow that bait back up underneath the dam in search of 4 ft flat heads. Though I had never seen their poles, I'm betting that the cane pole above is what they were using. Thanks for sharing. Btw, my father told me that when my grandmother would fry up one of those huge flat heads that it would smell up the house for a week, Ha
  23. yes, for protective purposes only
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