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Tying the Frosty Minnow


Guest Josh Glovinsky
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Very good video. Lots of info. It's like you've done this before.

I have never understood why people bother with a whip. Maybe somebody can sell me on the idea of using one at our

December NW Region fly tying meeting.

Thanks for posting.

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Guest rich mc

very good video. ill drink to that . i use a materelli rotating whip finisher. the only reason is that was used on my first fly and i thought that tool was so cool i enjoy using it. i have done hand whip finishbut my fingers are rough and catch he thread . rich

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Terry, the whip finish or a few half hitches are just a nice durable knot to finish off the fly and if done correctly, you won't need head cement (although you can surely use it if you like). I read not that long ago that the use of head cement is a relatively modern thing and up until a few decades ago wasn't used so your finishing knot had to be strong and resilient. Maybe Mike or Timothy can comment on that last statement, since they are much much older and wiser than I.

 

Btw, GregC from Lincoln once showed me a simple finishing knot that was shown to him by a western fly tying guru which was really quick and easy but I can't remember the specifics. It involved making a loop with your thread, make a wrap or two on the shank with your bobbin and then swinging the loop to the opposite side of the hook away from you and then pulling the loop back out. Wish I could find a video because it was slick and Greg swore by that knot.

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Guest rich mc

i whip finish and still add some of sally hansens finest clear nail polish. its not that the knot wont hold but to prevent thread damage by pliers removing the hook. i read somewhere that older anglers used varnish on the knot. rich

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Terry, the whip finish or a few half hitches are just a nice durable knot to finish off the fly and if done correctly, you won't need head cement (although you can surely use it if you like). I read not that long ago that the use of head cement is a relatively modern thing and up until a few decades ago wasn't used so your finishing knot had to be strong and resilient. Maybe Mike or Timothy can comment on that last statement, since they are much much older and wiser than I.

 

Btw, GregC from Lincoln once showed me a simple finishing knot that was shown to him by a western fly tying guru which was really quick and easy but I can't remember the specifics. It involved making a loop with your thread, make a wrap or two on the shank with your bobbin and then swinging the loop to the opposite side of the hook away from you and then pulling the loop back out. Wish I could find a video because it was slick and Greg swore by that knot.

 

When I started tying in the 50s head cement and nylon thread were established parts of the drill. I learned to tie the whip finish without a tool and have never bothered to learn to use a whip finisher.

 

Crank that back 60 years to 1890 and you would probably find some form of varnish and silk thread being used.The varnish served several purposes. First it would protect the silk thread from deteriorating. Waxing the silk was also important for the same reason. Second, it made a nice shiny head, that would sell better. It is hard to imagine tying back then since varnish dries so slowly and you might have to apply several coats to get the finish you want. Then there were silkworm gut leaders which is another story.

 

Crank forward to the present and ask Terry's question about the whip finish again. First, multiple half hitches would do the job if you don't mind a rough looking bulkier head. I got along for quite a while with half hitches. Second, thread wrapped and soaked in super glue with no knots at all is said to be the 21st century whip finish if you don't mind how it looks. You see my drift; part of the whip finish's charm is that it gives or can give a nice smooth head. Besides that it is a nice secure knot. I use it on the wings of bucktail and hackle streamers to be double sure they don't go anywhere once I get them in place. There is a cult of panfishermen that swear that bluegills smell head cements, glues, and nail polishes. Working without any kind of glue one needs a good knot like the whip finish. So the whip has both cosmetic and mechanical advantages.

 

Thanks to John for bringing up the double hitch. I will have to try it. Here's another link.

http://www.garyborge...e-double-hitch/

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That's the way I see it. If you use a whip then you probably don't need to use head cement or super glue.

I think I do the multiple half hitches top with super glue. If I'm looking for a smoother, shinier head then I'll use head cement.

All I'm trying to state is that If a person is going to coat the head of a fly with head cement or super glue then I don't think the whip is necessary.

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All I'm trying to state is that If a person is going to coat the head of a fly with head cement or super glue then I don't think the whip is necessary.

 

Especially if you're me and you know that most of your flies only last about three casts before I hang it up in a tree.

 

I did mention the Fly Tyer's Inverse Law didn't I? "The longer it takes me to tie a fly, the more quickly I lose it."

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Guest Josh Glovinsky

Especially if you're me and you know that most of your flies only last about three casts before I hang it up in a tree.

 

I did mention the Fly Tyer's Inverse Law didn't I? "The longer it takes me to tie a fly, the more quickly I lose it."

 

You got that right!

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