Jump to content

Rigging Plastics


kend
 Share

Recommended Posts

This topic is in response to the topic, "Parasite Clips Revisited: What We have been Missing".

 

The following comments are offer:

 

Extra hardware catches weed, grass, moss, and the like.

 

A drop of Fishin'Glue, has worked well for me.

 

Install the worm, grub, or the like, on the hook.

Place half-drop of Fishin'Glue in the spot, where the hook exits the worm, after inserting it thru the leading end of the plastic.

Fishin'glue is of a very thin viscosity, which allows deep penetrate into the cracks and crevises.

 

Fishin' Glue is available in 2 style applicators---

pointed nozel, or brush applicator.

 

Alternate:

Gamakatsu ""G-Lock"" EWG hooks, feature an "overbend", which retains the plastics onto the hook, much better over hooks that are straight or with shallow and rounded bends. The shallow rounded bends result in worms easily sliding down the hook.

 

Alternate 2:

Insert a round toothpick, across the width of the worm, and trim off the ends.

Position the toothpick, thru the worm, so the toothpick rests against the leading end of the hook, at the bend.

The toothpick rests in the offset (bend) of the hook, which results in increased resistance to slippage or sliding of the worm down the wire hook.

 

TIP:

When installing a worm, grub, or the like, onto your hook, position the hook-eye so its about 1/4" into the plastic.

A sliding weight, or the like, will rest against the plastic vs against the knot at the hook-eye.

 

My "RULE of THUMB": Select a hook, that has a throat depth of 2 times larger than the size of worm you're using.

 

TIP 2:

Fishin'Glue can also be used to mend tears and holes in plastics.

 

I separate the used worms, mend them at a later date, and return them to use to catch fish another day.

 

When using the fishin'glue, I generally catch several fish on the same worm/senko/grub.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Great tips, as always Ken.

 

I'll disagree on one point as it has applied to my experiences.

I love the Gamakatsu EWG hooks, but the G-Lock I avoid altogether.

My plastics always seem to slide around and off that sharp curve due to the downward angle on the hook point. Not so much with tubes, but worms and grubs slip off pretty regularly.

 

 

GGMGL.JPG

 

On the standard worm hook, no problems.

GXWHR.JPG

 

Again, this is just what I've found....your mileage may vary.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Mike,

 

The G-Lock has a slight forward overbend---which provides a shoulder that seems to help retain the plastic onto the hook.

 

Try inserting the ""hook-eye"" deeper into the plastic body---1/8 to 1/4", as I've mentioned in my previous post.

When I've inserted the plastic, only "up to the eye", I found it to be less effective---the plastic worm, grub, or the like, can come disconnected or torn off more easily, especially with softer baits.

 

Making a slower motion cast with spinning and casting rods, akin to fly rod casting, will put less stress on the joint, and reduce the likelyhood of the grub or worm being "snapped" off or torn away from the hook.

Quick "snap-casts", with the rod, can result is plastics coming dislodged prematurely.

 

I've tryed several other styles, over many years of testing and evaluating hooks various hooks and styles, and I've found the G-Lock is the most effective, rigging tubes, worms and grubs.

I use the EWG G-Lock almost exclusively, when rigging plastics---never a problem.

 

The EWG suffices as a keel, keeps the hook point in the upright position, reduces twisting and spinning.

 

Stop by for a demo.

 

I do like the straight shank worm hook by Gamakatsu, for some applications/presentations---

but that subject is for another day.

 

I'm not an expert, I just fish a lot.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

What about this...I've seen this suggested before but never used it...how about after inserting the hook eye 1/4" into the plastic, thread a piece of heavy mono or the toothpick up through the plastic and through the hook eye to hold the bait on the hook???

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I've been using small orthodontist rubber bands the same way you use the parasite clips. They give them away for free if you ask and they keep plastic baits from sliding down the hook.

Philf

Link to comment
Share on other sites

What about this...I've seen this suggested before but never used it...how about after inserting the hook eye 1/4" into the plastic, thread a piece of heavy mono or the toothpick up through the plastic and through the hook eye to hold the bait on the hook???

 

John,

Sounds like a good idea, give it a try and let us know how it works for you.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I've been using small orthodontist rubber bands the same way you use the parasite clips. They give them away for free if you ask and they keep plastic baits from sliding down the hook.

Philf

 

very clever!.....I'm keeping this in mind and will have to give it a try. Thanks!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...
 Share

×
×
  • Create New...