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traditional vs fly gear


Guest rich mc
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Guest rich mc

no. i'm not trying to start a rumble between the two . After seeing Dave Csanda"s presentation at the blowout i wanted to compare the two.. Dave mentioned lures and retrieves i wanted to get feedback on flies to match those lures.

i will go over a different segment tactic every day, by then the ice may be off the lakes.

 

First tactic was just after ice out and involved using a x rap. this was done in a crank it down, pause, rip, pause retrieve .. now what fly would use use to match that? i have my choices and did a newsletter article on it. So what would it be? rich

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Rich, good question.

 

To match a suspending lure, we need a suspending fly or at least a fly that sinks slowly and horizontally. Years ago I observed my uncle's deadly technique of dead sticking a bucktail. Of course the term deadsticking was not invented till years later. In the cold water of early spring, he would cast a 3" red and white bucktail to likely pockets and simply let it sink as long as the boat's motion would allow. It was a classic "do nothing" presentation. The strike came on the sink or as he began to pickup the fly for the next cast. Since I wasn't catching fish on my "rubber worms," this was very frustrating for me to watch. Just within the last few years, when the suspending baits became popular, I finally realized what he was doing and why it worked.

 

So I nominate the Red and White Bucktail Streamer with a silver mylar body.

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I just got some plastic lips to make a "crank fly". I'm going to fool around at the vise and I'll let you guys know what I come up with.

Joe

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Over my lunch hour today, I was reading an article in the March 2008 edition of In-Fisherman entitled, "Rigged and Ready at Ice-Out: Smallmouth Game Plan."

 

In the article, Matt Straw addressed several approaches, including suspending jerkbaits, jig-grub combo . . . and the one that really caught my interest is a float-and-fly system of which he states, "Time-tested things that seldom fail for spring smallmouths include float-and-fly systems." Matt recommends a 9-foot rod plus a 1/32-ounce synthetic hair jig under a fixed float using 6# flourocarbon line (or the same attached to a braided mainline with a barrel swivel).

 

Product names he likes include a small Rainbow Plastics A-Just-A-Bubble, and either a SPRO Phat Fly or a TC Tackle Stubby Shiner. Says that he believes smallies will continue to key on smaller shiner and fry imitations until the water warms to above 50 degrees. That may take some time in northern Illinois considering the unusual cold weather we've been experiencing lately . . . so perhaps a float-and-fly will be ideal for the next few weeks until it warms up.

 

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Guest rich mc

i think i would cast a large streamer such as the flashtail whistler, murdich minnow or a murdered muppet they all have a good body profile, sink very slow or suspend, and they have a body to push water so a fish can feel it . even a large double bunny may work. rich

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Over my lunch hour today, I was reading an article in the March 2008 edition of In-Fisherman entitled, "Rigged and Ready at Ice-Out: Smallmouth Game Plan."

 

In the article, Matt Straw addressed several approaches, including suspending jerkbaits, jig-grub combo . . . and the one that really caught my interest is a float-and-fly system of which he states, "Time-tested things that seldom fail for spring smallmouths include float-and-fly systems." Matt recommends a 9-foot rod plus a 1/32-ounce synthetic hair jig under a fixed float using 6# flourocarbon line (or the same attached to a braided mainline with a barrel swivel).

 

Product names he likes include a small Rainbow Plastics A-Just-A-Bubble, and either a SPRO Phat Fly or a TC Tackle Stubby Shiner. Says that he believes smallies will continue to key on smaller shiner and fry imitations until the water warms to above 50 degrees. That may take some time in northern Illinois considering the unusual cold weather we've been experiencing lately . . . so perhaps a float-and-fly will be ideal for the next few weeks until it warms up.

 

Agree with Matt except for the need for 6lbs flourocarbon line and the silly long rod. I use 8lbs test and a my normal 6'9" ML XF Avid- works good enough.

 

FnF catches big fish. I believe because of the time of year. Metabolism rates of small fish under 12" might mean they only feed once a week or less while larger fish feed more often and have energy reserves enough to be activly feeding in winter. The FnF is an easy meal dangling there and they eat!

 

FnF will outproduce other techniques in cold water hands down. I am starting to catch some on jerkbaits.

 

Frankly, fellas, I'm going to miss the predictability of good FnF. Been mostly banging away with it for four months.

 

BT

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I made a few flies with plastic lips like a crankbait. I posted them in the bass bugger submissions section. I tested them in the official testing tank (my bathtub) :D hey it works. they do have a unique action, they mimic a dying minnow. they dart back and fourth then fall slowly. I'm going to continue to try and refine them and try different thing to see what I can come up with. I guess these are the "prototypes" check them out.

Joe

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