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Ouch that hurt


ronk
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From x-x I hear about guys having trouble casting weighted streamers such as clousers( which due to their slim profile and non absorption of water tied with bucktail are actually the easiest to cast).As an alternative to a standard overhead cast for those who do is a cast developed many years ago by Lee Wulff which he called the constant oval.Instead of an overhead backcast a sidearmed cast is made. The rod is then immediately swept upward as a standard overhead forward cast is made.The reason he called it that name is that the cast is made in one constant, continuous motion without any hesitating between the back/forward casts. This cast keeps the weighted fly from falling low behind you thereby preventing it from possibly striking you on the forward cast.Don't attempt it if there's a crosswind blowing the line at you.As with any cast hauling makes the cast easier and gains distance.

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The cast is known as an "elliptical" or "Belgian Cast". Should be standard practice for all casting Clousers, heavy beadhead buggers & the like. Casting heavy flies such as these with a standard overhead cast will cause the leader to "hinge" at the leader/flyline connection & the fly & leader will tuck downward at the end of the backcast preventing a smooth forward cast. I once fished with a guide who had a hardhat in the boat & he would wear it when he guided someone who was not proficient in the elliptical cast! It was a hoot!

 

Brian

 

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Brian

It also helps to keep even an unweighted fly from hitting the water/ground on the backcast when using rods of 8' or less.Unless your guide was kidding around I bet he got a lot of ribbing from the other macho guides for that helmet.Though I do this cast occasionally as a change of pace a standard overhead cast works ok for me with weighted flies as long as hauls are made.

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Yes, Ron it's a good cast, but contrary to what you say, it was NOT developed by Lee Wulff. It has been around longer than he has and was very popular overseas, which is how it got the name of the Belgium Cast. There are many variations on the cast from eliptical, oval, Belgium, to circle cast. All rely on a constant pull on the line as you move through the cast. Some even call it a constant tension or constant pull cast. That's why the cast works well for heavy flies. You're not stopping the rod during the backcast as in a conventional overhead cast.

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Mike

In an article Wulff wrote about 30 years ago describing it he named the cast the Constant Oval.Since he gave it a name it would seem in reading the article that he developed it as well not for weighted flies but for the short rods of 6- 7' rods he preferred using even for his beloved Atlantic Salmon on his theory that shorter rods were actually better fish fighting tools.Since you say it didn't originate with him do you know who it did originate with and when?

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Mike

In an article Wulff wrote about 30 years ago describing it he named the cast the Constant Oval.Since he gave it a name it would seem in reading the article that he developed it as well not for weighted flies but for the short rods of 6- 7' rods he preferred using even for his beloved Atlantic Salmon on his theory that shorter rods were actually better fish fighting tools.Since you say it didn't originate with him do you know who it did originate with and when?

 

Ron,

I'm sorry, I don't recall but I can try to find out. I do know with certainty that it came from Europe because when I was doing research for my FFF certification, that specific question came up and I waas informed multiple times that fly fishing also exists outside of the good ole/ USA and many take credit for things attributable ot othe very proficient anglers outside of the USA. This was one specific example given to me where a technique used elsewhere was learned and brought over to the USA and proliferated along with the assumption that the proponent of the technique had in fact come up with it. He may have discovered it and, I don't want to take anything away from a great flyfisher, but let's give him the proper credit of recognizing a good technique and espousing it instead if develong or inventing it!

 

I'll look for you on who came up with it and let you know if I find out. It may be though that some non-famous and possibly unknown angler saw a need, developed a technique, used it and it developed a following.

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Whenever I fish weighted streamers or split shots with nymphs, I always use a side arm cast going back, and an overhead going forward. The large loops help prevent fouling when turning over. In addition, I always try to employ a double haul at the same time (single haul at a minimum). For me, large loops and minimal false casts are the keys for casting heavy flies or indicator rigs.

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What works for me with heavily weighted flies is to drift the rod tip back on the backcast or even allow some line to slip backwards(reverse shooting) to eliminate some of the bounce that you get when the heavy fly reaches the end of the backcast. Sometimes a softer rod does this all on its own. With this I do not have to open the loop on my cast as much allowing me more line speed and distance.

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Unless its really windy and blowing your line into you while you cast just angling your rod off to the side at an angle should keep your line and fly away from you. If the wind is to strong then go with a backhand cast on your downwind side. Another thing I like to do when I'm casting and have the current below my right side ( I'm right handed casting) I'll let the fly hit the water for a split second on my backcast into my forecast and this will help to load the rod. It takes a little timing and practice but can reduce false casting.

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2 otherways to deal with a crosswind into you are to tilt the rod to the right for the backcast and than tilt it over to your left side for the forward so that the wind is blowing it away from you on the forward cast.The other and surest way to avoid getting hit is to turn around and face the opposite direction so that vthe wind is blowing the line away from you during both the back and forward casts.The backcast then becomes your delivery cast.Regardless of the conditions false casts should be kept to a minimum if not eliminated altogether unless your drying off a fly as in dryflying for trout.False casting wastes time and energy increases the chance for a foul up and no fly will catch fish while it's airborne.Amost all my casts are done without falsecasting or with no more than one.

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