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Ah spring.....the season of change and tailing loops


Michael T
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Just as expected, spring has brought back the promise of greenery and the dreaded tailing loop. It would be worth living in a more hospitable climate so that one could fly fish 11 to 12 months a year JUST to not have the annual return of the tailing loop! I've thrown the fly rod once or twice this winter in the back yard, but I threw my 7 weight. However, the 4/5 weight I threw yesterday in a pond feels so drastically different, it's like learning to cast all over again. I know the things I'm not supposed to be doing, and when I remember not to do them, I get a nice smooth reasonably tight loop that turns over beautifully.....and then, there's the other 80% of my casts.

 

So fellow Bass Buggers, do you experiece this same issue? Are you a more profficient caster with a particular rod weight or style over another? How many trips to the water does it take to get your casting stroke back?

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Just as expected, spring has brought back the promise of greenery and the dreaded tailing loop. It would be worth living in a more hospitable climate so that one could fly fish 11 to 12 months a year JUST to not have the annual return of the tailing loop! I've thrown the fly rod once or twice this winter in the back yard, but I threw my 7 weight. However, the 4/5 weight I threw yesterday in a pond feels so drastically different, it's like learning to cast all over again. I know the things I'm not supposed to be doing, and when I remember not to do them, I get a nice smooth reasonably tight loop that turns over beautifully.....and then, there's the other 80% of my casts.

 

So fellow Bass Buggers, do you experiece this same issue? Are you a more profficient caster with a particular rod weight or style over another? How many trips to the water does it take to get your casting stroke back?

 

 

Stay smooth; it's not power you are looking for it's the application of power.

 

As with all of the good things in life too much too soon is always detrimental.

 

Stop by the shop, we'll help you out.

 

Joseph

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Practice makes perfect. I've been practicing in back yard off and on, and I seemed to do OK with my four weight and my six weight. After a few casts, I was tossing good loops. The eight weight rod was another story. It will take a bit more practice with the heavier rod to get me casts down. I tried casting my four weight yesterday at Lake Arlington and the wind was howling so hard that I was kicking myself for not bringing a six weight.

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Moving from clousers to elk hair caddis and back again always messes with me for a while. I'd say I like casting wooly buggers on a 5wt, that always seems to work fine. Lighter or heavier rods/lures takes some adjusting for me.

 

But generally, I'm pretty much always using too much muscle. When things get ugly, I force myself to practice with as little power as possible. Usually that little trick helps give the feedback I need to correct whatever mistakes I'm making with my cast at the given time... the list is long and unpredictable!

 

But it's great to be casting again, isn't it!

 

:)

 

-jamieS

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