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Ted Williams and the Atlantic Salmon


Tom L
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Watching that, I forgot that the "Splendid Splinter" was actually right handed (casted right handed) but batted lefty. I had to laugh when the Sears promo came up in the beginning because when I was a boy, everything and I mean everything in the Sears sporting goods and outdoor dept. had his name on it, probably even the roller skates. Thanks for sharing.

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Tom,

funny, Timothy T. just sent me those same links of Lee Wulff a couple days ago and as I was telling him, what a tough life, Wulff, McNally, and Ted Williams must have had, flying all over north America in search of pristine untouched and unfished waters in the 40's and 50's. I guess someone had to do it, but I wonder where I can sign up for that gig. Wulff was always known for being able to land large fish with really light gear just like in the film.

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To me the 3 most enjoyable things to see in sport are Gale Sayers' broken field running,Ted Williams hitting a baseball,& Lee Wulff casting a flyrod.Wulff was the greatest flyfisherman ever.After blowing a good fish due to a bad cast he resolved he'd never again make a bad one.Only he could aspire to such an impossible goal.He preferred short rods believing they were better fish fighting tools. I understand the reels he used often had no drags & of course didn't provide the fish fighting benefit of being rimless.Towards the end of his life he was too infirm to fish standing up.I'll always believe he flew that plane into a mountain on purpose no longer able to do the things he loved.There was a life to be envied.

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Did you all notice how weepy those rods that they were using, compared to today's graphite rods? They were able to shoot line 80'-90' out without a haul. The guide was standing on the canoe and poling in rapids without a lifejacket. And how about that vise Ted was using?

 

For better or worst, how things had changed in the last 40-50 years.

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Tom

While it was said that Wulff could cast an entire line with just the tip section , which I'd have to see to believe, I don't think 80-90' casts wrere made in either video.Wulff's casts probably topped out in the low 70's his having said in the video that he normally fished casts in a tight upper 60- low 70's range.He was also using an 8wt,a powerful rod with which to cast those small salmon flies.I would think even Wulff would have to haul to reach 80-90' distances. Thanks for posting those old vids.They brought back good memories of watching Curt Gowdy fishing with Wulff on the The American Sportsman series in the 60's.

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Good video.

 

I think Lee was an early champion of the "flea" rod, that is a rod 6 ft or less long.

 

BTW Casting 60 ft with a tip should be easy. Here's two guys who do not even need a tip.

 

 

http://www.gofishn.com/gofishn/8471-bet-this-guy-can-cast-fly-cast-better-without-a-rod-than-you-can-with-one/

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Mike

I saw Larry Dahlberg make that kind of sans flyrod cast at a show a few yrs back.Very impressive .I'm sure you know that all flylines are at least 90' however.The difference between a 60' & a 90' cast in diifficulty is considerable.And Wulff didn't have the benefit of today's distance flylines & rods.

From what I understand those short rods Wulff favored were powerfull nonetheless and if so would've been custom built to his specifications.He realized that a shorter rod had more leverage against a big fish one reason I don't like those pole vaults they call spey rods.

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