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Cold water/arthritic knees


Chris Meade
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I was wondering if any of you smallie hunters with ancient legs might have a suggestion. Once the beginning of October comes, I can hardly wade any more. The cold temps seep right through my polypropolene long johns, jeans, and waders and render my knees useless (I can take the cold on the other parts of my legs). Do any of you fellow arthritis sufferers have a method for concentrating heat or insulation on those joints?

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You might try using neoprene waders when the water turns colder. Or at least maybe you could try wrapping your knees in a neoprene knee support. The cold doesn't bother my arthritic knees as much as my feet. Wading has been the best medicine as far as reducing the effect of arthritis on my knee joints but I'd sure like to find something that could keep my feet warm. Diabetes has reduced the circulation in my feet and they are always cold.

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I was wondering if any of you smallie hunters with ancient legs might have a suggestion. Once the beginning of October comes, I can hardly wade any more. The cold temps seep right through my polypropolene long johns, jeans, and waders and render my knees useless (I can take the cold on the other parts of my legs). Do any of you fellow arthritis sufferers have a method for concentrating heat or insulation on those joints?

 

First make sure your core is warm because of it gets cold your body works to keep your organs warm, sacrificing extremties. Someone posted this tip when I complained about cold fingers. It's true.

 

Second, blue jeans and cotton s the most worthless fabric of all time. It really has no redeeming value. It sucks in every way possible.

Go poly propylene( like Under Armor, not Walmart stuff) followed by a layer of fleece. You can buy cheap fleece at places like Marshalls and TJ Max. Actually you can find nice name brand stuff there.

If you are old school, wool is the way to go. Actually, I think wool, especially nice wool is a truly wonderful material.

 

Third if I had bad knees I would bandage up a chemical warming pack, like hot hands on each knee cap.

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I would echo both Scott and Mark. I can't say I'm getting too much arthur yet but the cold water does feel pretty darn good on my joints and muscles, it's like a giant ice pack until I'm standing still too long and realize I better move before my muscles start to not want to work.

 

Love my UA! Fleece and wool also rock. Another option besides the hot hands is all the different size warming pads for different parts of the body which can be found in any drug store. They might even make one specifically for knees.

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On other sights, I'm known as Creekyknees so you know they aren't the greatest. I actually prefer breathables with Under Armour or poly pro to neoprenes and I wade all winter long. I've found that getting out of the water periodically and walking around helps. Other than that, I keep the core warm and will use handwarmers right from the get go to keep my hands from even getting cold. When the hands are toasty, I'll slide them in my pants pocket to help keep the core warm. Alternate as needed.

 

Don't forget to eat while fishing in coldwater, keep the fuel going for the furnace so to speak. A thermos of something warm to drink can help as well.

 

Like Scott, I'm diabetic so the blood flow to extremities ain't what it used to be, well it at least feels that way.

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You might try using neoprene waders when the water turns colder. Or at least maybe you could try wrapping your knees in a neoprene knee support. The cold doesn't bother my arthritic knees as much as my feet. Wading has been the best medicine as far as reducing the effect of arthritis on my knee joints but I'd sure like to find something that could keep my feet warm. Diabetes has reduced the circulation in my feet and they are always cold.

You might try a bigger wading boot for cold water to allow for an xtra pair of socks.Try 2mm neoprene socks perhaps over a pair of wool socks too.Layering under 5mm stocking foot neoprenes especially on the feet keeps my feet from getting too cold when I floatube for trout at the club I belong to sometimes into December or even January with skim ice on the water.Full fingered neoprene gloves with fold back slits on the thumb& index finger keep hands from getting too cold.The surest way to keep feet warm wading is with bootfoot waders.They permit better circulation for your feet.I wear 5mm bootfoot waders when I start wading in March with water around 40 degrees & stay toasty thruout.They're available from Cabela's for $80 for 3mm-$130 for 5mm.

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About 90% of my cold weather fishing is done from shore just dipping into small eddies. The waders are there to keep me dry if I should slip and to provide protection from the cold and wind. Wait for the water to get cold and high and fish a larger river that allows you to walk the banks. The fish will be jammed up against the shore.

Phil f

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