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Float Tube Tips


JRich
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To All:

 

I am looking to try float tubing for the first time and was wondering if any of you crafty veterans could offer me some tips. I weigh 265 and while an inner tube secured around my waist would probably have a "slimming effect" on my appearance (haha), I want to be sure that I purchase a tube that will keep me dry and comfortable. So, do any of you have a product or brand recommendation considering my circumstances? Also, the places that I have in mind to float require quite a bit of walking; are there any tips for transportation? Inflation? Thanks in advance for your advice.

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Hi JRich,

 

I used to use a float tube a lot on a small lake here in Northern Illinois. I used a U-Boat and loved it. I would recommend a tube that you think you can easily get into and out of, as mounting and dismounting at the waters edge can sometimes be an adventure. I weigh 220-240 & had no problems. Mine came with a foot pump and it seemed to work fine, but my father bought a little electric air pump that we would plug into a cigarette lighter in the car & it was really nice.

 

Since you posted on the bassbuggers forum, I am assuming you are going to fly fish. If you ever bring a spinning or casting rod with you to change things up the only thing I can recommend is: shorter is better. Nothing worse than having to dunk your reel when you are trying to work out a problem with the rod tip.

 

Good luck!

 

J Zuzevich

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I would suggest you look at the ratings on the tubes and look for a 300-350lb capacity tube. The u-style tubes as stated in the previous post make entering and exiting the tube much easier. Some of the better constructed tubes would be the outcast/fishcat series of tubes. As far as fins, standard float tube fins from caddis or creek company will work fine. If money is not a concern, Bass Proshops stocks a "prowler" model from outcast that is designed with a 325lb. weight capacity and is extremely stable, but cost about 500$. Add a decent set of fins and you will have a great setup that will provides years of use if you take care of it and store the tube partailly uninflated and out of direct sunlight when not using it.

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Cabela's flyfishing catalog has a number of good floatubes with weight ratings of 300-350lbs from $149-210.Both the Togiak which I own & the Cumberland are rated at 350& come with backpack straps essential for walk in trips.To make the seat more comfortable I added a small inflatable seat cushion called a Bunsaver to mine which I found at Gander Mtn.I like the swim fins from Creek Company($45).Just make sure you don't pull'em on by the strap instead of pushing them on by the fin itself.They float.I wear a pair of either canvas slip ons or apair of waterproof slip ons called sand & surfs available from Walmart to get to/from the water which I than remove.Get 1 or 2 sizes larger to accommodate stockingfoot waders.The tube should be partially deflated between trips & as has been pointed out a pump working off a car's cigarette lighter takes only seconds to fully inflate.Nothing compares to a floatube for stillwater fishing.It allows you to easily move about or hold a pinpoint position while leaving your hands free to fish & allows access to places that wouldn't be otherwise.

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To All:

 

I am looking to try float tubing for the first time and was wondering if any of you crafty veterans could offer me some tips. I weigh 265 and while an inner tube secured around my waist would probably have a "slimming effect" on my appearance (haha), I want to be sure that I purchase a tube that will keep me dry and comfortable. So, do any of you have a product or brand recommendation considering my circumstances? Also, the places that I have in mind to float require quite a bit of walking; are there any tips for transportation? Inflation? Thanks in advance for your advice.

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Hi, I've got two issues that I find help for with my float tube. I have the Prowler from OutCast.

 

They advertise it as for "the mature angler" which I find a hoot. I weigh 250. The other issue is that I have metal replacements for two of my vertebrae, and other float tubes were painful to sit in for a day, but the inflatable seat in the Prowler is good for me. Finally, it is fairly light and comes with shoulder straps; my wife also has one [she's petite, but likes the comfortable seat] and we also bought the insulated, triangular-sort-of-shaped, bag, into which we put our food, water and tackle. I hook my fins into the area above the seat, and then walk in, sometimes for most of an hour, and fish downstream. I put 2 carabiners on the back loops of the insulated bag, and they attach it to the front of the straps where Outcast has thoughtfully put D-rings. I can send you a pix if you want the picture rather than just words. Or, call if you want, number below

 

The tube has proved reliable; I bought one of the early ones in November of ... ??? 2007 ??? ... and it's bleached out in the sun, but is still fully functional; the floor sprung a leak and Outcast replaced it promptly. Other than that, it's been primo.

 

I also use and like the small K-Pump, which is small enough to pack along if one is anxious. After years of use, I'm no longer worried about leaks, so I just top it off at the truck and go for the day.

 

happy floating, John Oerter ~ 217-781-1630

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