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A fly fisherman is born!


Jonn Graham
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I had a client today who brought along a few flyrods and a couple of spinning rods. At around 9:00 while switching river locations, he asked if I wanted to try out one of his flyrods. I said, "you bet". He gave me a quick 10 minute fly fishing lesson next to the truck. He liked my casting enough to let me handle the long rod down on the river.

 

Amazingly, I was casting fairly well right off the bat. My client was impressed and gave me lots of encouragment. I was having a ball. Using an 8 weight, I started off using a small deer hair popper. Nothing on that so I switched to a clouser and had one strike. Next, I tried a very small wooly bugger and caught three smallies. Though they were small, it was awesome. Actually, catching the fish was bonus - I was having a great time just getting better and longer casts. I ended the day casting a big deer bug that kinda looked like a frog. Though I did not get any strikes on the deer hair bug, I enjoyed using that big boy the most. I can tell when I get a fly rod (which won't be long now), I am going to favor large poppers and popping bugs.

 

 

 

Anybody out there want to sell me a used 8 wt. with a reel, line, and backing............maybe a carrying case as well? I will entertain all offers.

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Does this mean that I won't have to be the only guy at the outings with a fly rod anymore?

Careful Jonn, fly fishing is highly addictive, and it spirals out of control easily.....just ask my wife.

First was a couple rods & reels, then I decided I wanted to tie my own flies, then I got into antique

split-bamboo rods, then I decided I wanted to restore bamboo rods, now I want to make my own

bamboo rods..........it's a disease.

 

I'll have both my rods at the outing on Saturday if you want to use one. I have a 6wt. & an 8wt.

 

 

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Jim:

 

You crack me up!! You should have known it was only a matter of time before I turned to the "dark side". Don't worry all the spinning and casting rods/reels are not going in the garbage...............yet. ;)

 

 

Jonn-

You already have a tying vise. Right?

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Jonn,

 

You are in serious trouble. You may start out with a used 8 eight weight, but it won't be long until you have a quiver of fly rods and so many lines and reels that you be won't be able to remember how many you have. In addition, you will start tying flies and within a couple of years your house, basement, and garage will be filled with feathers, fur, and flashy synthetic stuff.

 

You have been warned.

 

By the way, you should immediately consider getting a three or four weight fly rod for panfish. You may as well start feeding your new addiction.

 

Alan

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Great news, Jonn! Soon you will be decorating the stream side trees with $$ flies.

 

As long as you will be buying rods, think 5, 7, 9 weights or 4, 6, 8 to cover the normal range of warm water fishing. No one rod covers all the bases just like spinning and casting. For stream bass the 6 or 7 would be a good starter for casting medium streamers and bugs. 4 and 5 for panfish. 8 and 9 will get you into Pike, Muskie, and light saltwater.

 

PS the flea rods-1, 2, 3-are, IMHO, micro rods for micro fish. I would rather catch a whale than catch a bluegill that feels like a whale.

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Well, John there ARE more than a few Float and Fliers out there now. Maybe you could popularize winter float and Fly with a flyrod. See no reason why that wouldn't work very well.

 

I'd also want a larger fly rod, because I think most smallie flyrodders throw too small of baits.

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I'd also want a larger fly rod, because I think most smallie flyrodders throw too small of baits.

This comment does not reflect the views of the ISA. Please forward any rebuttal directly to Brendan through the "PM" feature of this forum, to save the rest of us from witnessing once again the debate over the size of flies thrown for smallies. :rolleyes:

 

Now.... back to our regularly scheduled discussions! :)

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Jonn you might want to try that 6 wt, its perfect for fishing our small flows and wont wear you out after throwing it all day.

 

I have an eight weight and if you intend to throw big poppers all day in the wind on bigger flows like the KKK the eight weight would be the best choice. But our small streams where we are throwing streamers and small poppers and you are protected from the wind I think you will enjoy the lighter rod a lot more.

 

I have even used my three weight on really small streams and had a blast landing smallies under 12".

I have a spare 6 wt I put togeather last year for people in your situation to use. If you arent busy Sunday, or some other time, and want to try it out let me know.

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Jonn, I doubt I can make the trip, this Saturday, but I can get you some flies to play with. One you REALLY ought to consider, at this time of year, is the Hopper. DEADLY in the smaller meadow flows. I've taken several 17"-18" smallies with it, so it ain't just for the dinks. Sparkleminnow, sz 4 pearl, of course. And, A few Coffey Grinders. With all the rain, this year, I've not had much time on the water. But, maybe we can hook up for a Saturday trip, and some Flyfishing instruction.

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Steve's right on about line weight. I always take my 6 & my 8 and decide what to use when I get to the river. Last Sunday I got to Mathiesen Park & there was a pretty good breeze blowing, so thought I'd take the 8 to combat the wind. I hiked down to the river & there wasn't much of any wind on the water, but didn't want to make the uphill hike just to exchange rods. After 4 hours of casting the 8wt. my right arm felt like it would fall off. I might have felt better about it if I was at least catching fish! This time of year with low water conditions, a 6wt. is ideal.

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Jonn,

If you can cast that well the first time out you'll be a natural.Don't listen to Joz. He's just too hardheaded to

admit that he'd like to try it too. :P After getting proficient with the basic cast learn to dubl haul. It'll turbocharge your casting enabling you to easily cast those deerhair bassbugs.

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be careful, there is no cure for flyfishing. you will have it for the rest of your life!! I know, I'm infected pretty bad myself!

 

Joe

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Great news, Jonn! Soon you will be decorating the stream side trees with $$ flies.

 

As long as you will be buying rods, think 5, 7, 9 weights or 4, 6, 8 to cover the normal range of warm water fishing. No one rod covers all the bases just like spinning and casting. For stream bass the 6 or 7 would be a good starter for casting medium streamers and bugs. 4 and 5 for panfish. 8 and 9 will get you into Pike, Muskie, and light saltwater.

 

PS the flea rods-1, 2, 3-are, IMHO, micro rods for micro fish. I would rather catch a whale than catch a bluegill that feels like a whale.

 

I agree with your first statement but not the ps.Flyfishing for big bedding 'gills with a flea rod has always been a high point in my flyfishing year.During that brief 3 week or so period I largely forsake other fish to concentrate on them and am actually disappointed when I catch a gamefish instead.Plenty of time for them the rest of the season.It's also nice to know that it's ok to take some home.Fine eating.

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Well, I now have a cheap 8 weight outfit and Rio Clouser line on the way. The line should be here by Tuesday. The line that came on the reel was level wind and it is horrid.

 

I can see what many of you have suggested about the 6 weight. The 8 weight is a bit taxing on the arm and my carpal tunnel wrist. I am already seriously thinking of getting a 6 weight. My flows are so small, I am sure I could still throw the big stuff with the 6 weight.

 

Greg:

 

As soon as I got the fly rod, I thought of you. I sure would like to get a few of your favorite flys............especially the sparkle minnows. When you get time, if you would, box me up some of your favorite selections, and send them to me. Just drop a note in the box and let me know how much I owe you. I would really appreciate some of your fine work.

 

Brendan:

 

I agreed wholeheartedly with what you said. I too have always felt that fly rodders throw way too many small baits. I know I have great luck throwing larger baits on the spin/casting rods over the years. There is no reason why larger offerings on the fly rod would do any different. So far I have thrown larger poppers that I made myself (yes, I have already been on the vise making fly rod poppers), a big deer hair bug, and a few Murray Murauders. In a few days I plan to get some more big bugs, a few Dahlberg Divers, and maybe an extra clouser or two. I have also played a little with the Holschlag Hackle Fly.

 

I can already feel the addiction taking over.

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My flows are so small, I am sure I could still throw the big stuff with the 6 weight.

 

Jonn

 

The difficulty with throwing the "big stuff" is often the added wind resistance from the bulk of the fly. Add a little wind, and well it can get a bit frustrating casting. The heavier weight lines cut through the wind more efficiently and help carry the fly where you want it to go. I have been using a 7 weight all season and to be honest I wish I had an 8 weight. My 5 weight has been sitting in the tube virtually all year, not that I haven't tried it.

 

This is my first season fly fishing, and I have found the experience to be a challenging and refreshing change of pace. Except for one day earlier this spring, I haven't picked up my spinning or casting gear all season, and I don't miss it one bit.

 

It is quite the addiction. I hope it brings you the same enjoyment.

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I am presently looking to purchase a six weight rod/reel combo. I have a few that I like from Cabela's that are in my price range. A few that I am looking at are:

 

Redington Cross water combo

Lefty Kreh Series One combo

Cabela's Three Forks combos.

 

Anybody want to comment on these combos, it would be much appreciated.

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