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Packing Deer Hair-Tip


Mark K
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Finally getting a chance to tie some flies.

 

Tied my first deer hair bug in a while and made a major improvement on the first bug, thanks to some instruction from the Skip Morris DVD, "The Art of Tying the Bass Fly". My bugs were always fishable, and caught fish but they were always thin and ugly. The important concept that always got by me was that it's the half hitch between bundles, that HOLDS the packed hair back on the shank of the hook. Thats the secret to packing tightly. If you don't put a nice tight half hitch or two between bundles they just spring right back.

Maybe it's justa problem unique me but I just thought I'd pass on the tip.

 

The first fly came out hard as a rock. Of course I never learn.... there's a certain point to... Put the razor down. So nothings picture perfect...yet.

 

and it's a good thing I'm not a barber.

 

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Mark, have you got any pics of your work? To me, that's one of the most difficult ties, a nice looking deer hair bug or Dahlberg Diver.

 

Yeah, you ain't kidding. I think I can tie a dozen or two buggers or Clousers in the time it takes to do one of these.

 

this is the first deer hair fly I've tied in probably a year. Consider it a rough draft.

(Sorry about the big file, editing software trouble)

 

9910dc.jpg

 

 

Been intentionally putting much more work into getting the deer hair portion right. Been using econo-hooks (Mustad 3366) and not getting to artsy-fartsy with the rest of the fly.

 

 

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Well done Mark.

 

I learned by watching (and rewatching many times) Chris Helm's dvd. His little Brassie tool works really well and he's not shy about applying glue to those half-hitches between bundles. Adding the glue takes a little time but the result is the best way to maintain a tight pack.

 

Next step: using different colors in bands or making the belly a different color than the "wing." Or, spots on a frog's back?

 

You've sparked my interest in spinning some deer hair.....blast you Mark! It's been a good 6 months for me...time to break out the gel-spun and brassie.

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Well done Mark.

 

I learned by watching (and rewatching many times) Chris Helm's dvd. His little Brassie tool works really well and he's not shy about applying glue to those half-hitches between bundles. Adding the glue takes a little time but the result is the best way to maintain a tight pack.

 

Next step: using different colors in bands or making the belly a different color than the "wing." Or, spots on a frog's back?

 

You've sparked my interest in spinning some deer hair.....blast you Mark! It's been a good 6 months for me...time to break out the gel-spun and brassie.

 

 

I figure 99% of the time spin fishing I have a topwater on, so I should learn to tie and cast these things. I have noticed deer hair casts better than other poppers and more importantly looks cooler.

 

What kind of glue did he use? Skip Morris uses epoxy.

He also uses rod building thread.

 

Let me get this straight, he uses the glue to maintain a tight pack while tying? It would have to be fast drying.

 

Which video do you have?

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Besides, there's nothing more exciting than watching a smallie take top water.

 

He uses conventional head cement. It's not exactly that it maintains the tight pack while tying, but helps somewhat and it makes for a very durable fly. It's applied after the half-hitches and the pack. I'll loosen the vise's jaws and rotate the fly so that the hook's eye it pointing up, then push the deer hair back to expose the shank, then add the glue liberally at the hitches.

 

The only thing I don't care for about deer hair is they do soak up water eventually. Tighter the pack the less they soak and the longer it takes. I haven't experimented with flotants and such....perhap that will help.

 

I think it's his first deer hair dvd: Hooked on tying - Spinning Deer Hair with Chris Helm. He's got several dvds that he works with other accomplished tyers who work with deer hair. I took a class with him at One More Cast a year or two ago and it's most impressive watching him work the razor blade. Tying with deer hair is one thing, but shaping them is a WHOLE 'nother thing!

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Besides, there's nothing more exciting than watching a smallie take top water.

 

He uses conventional head cement. It's not exactly that it maintains the tight pack while tying, but helps somewhat and it makes for a very durable fly. It's applied after the half-hitches and the pack. I'll loosen the vise's jaws and rotate the fly so that the hook's eye it pointing up, then push the deer hair back to expose the shank, then add the glue liberally at the hitches.

 

The only thing I don't care for about deer hair is they do soak up water eventually. Tighter the pack the less they soak and the longer it takes. I haven't experimented with flotants and such....perhap that will help.

 

I think it's his first deer hair dvd: Hooked on tying - Spinning Deer Hair with Chris Helm. He's got several dvds that he works with other accomplished tyers who work with deer hair. I took a class with him at One More Cast a year or two ago and it's most impressive watching him work the razor blade. Tying with deer hair is one thing, but shaping them is a WHOLE 'nother thing!

 

 

I agree on all counts.

Dave Whitlock uses Flexament that has been diluted with Flexament thinner to water thin viscosity. The fly sucks it up like a sponge.

Divers seem to me to work a bit better once they soak up some water. A rabbit strip diver has awesome action under water.

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