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Indiana shares blame for Gulf 'dead zone'


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Tim ,

 

A good sized chunk comes from the Kankakee I'll bet . I remember from some meetings with the IDNR , COE , and the Water Survey folks that the Kankakee contributed 40% of the sediment load to the Illinois River . Nothing of any significance has been done to change that and with the increasing amount of sediment coming over the dam in Kankakee that figure prolly went up .

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Norm, sediment from the Kank is brutal, yes.

 

The real culprit here though is nitrogen and phosphorus. Those are coming from places like Chicago septic waste and the spring cornfield run-off from anhydrous ammonia. In the eighties, we found springtime levels of nitrate in the Kaskaskia that were above the EPA limits for toxicity (>40mg/l).

 

I wonder if it will ever occur to Louisiana to do anything. I grew up there and I can tell you that as a state, they're about as environmentally sensitive as a bowling ball.

 

 

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Tim ,

 

From what I've heard of Louisianna politicos , they seem to like "political contributions" more than Chicago alderman . Mebbe if the fish and game down there had some cash ........ :rolleyes:

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Norm, sediment from the Kank is brutal, yes.

 

The real culprit here though is nitrogen and phosphorus. Those are coming from places like Chicago septic waste and the spring cornfield run-off from anhydrous ammonia. In the eighties, we found springtime levels of nitrate in the Kaskaskia that were above the EPA limits for toxicity (>40mg/l).

 

I wonder if it will ever occur to Louisiana to do anything. I grew up there and I can tell you that as a state, they're about as environmentally sensitive as a bowling ball.

 

LMAO...at the bowlling ball comment.

 

On the nutrient issue though, I was at a meeting last week and the word I was hearing is that EPA might be mandating nutrient criteria levels in our waterbodies like they currently do with e-coli as concerns impairment listing. Impairment listing then mandates a plan of action to correct or remediate by the states, so this could be interesting. I think it might be why Indiana IDEM is in the process of trying to drop PCB's and mercury as criteria for 303(d) listing in the state as we speak...

 

-Brian

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From what I've heard of Louisianna politicos , they seem to like "political contributions" more than Chicago alderman .

 

 

HA! It has occurred to me many times that most Louisianians must be from Chicago or vice versa, Norm.

 

Brian, the states are all being made to comply with TMDL regulations for all nutrients and the EPA is actively working on the dead zone issue. You can see some of the plans and the progress of the legislation on the Prairie Rivers Network and IEPA websites.

 

Illinois is probably behind all the rest at this point, although TMDLs have been created for numerous watersheds. When we were working on a scientific basis for nutrient criteria, there was a general consensus that there were limited effects of nutrients in large streams and there doesn't seem to be much will to force the sewage treatment industry to take even more nutrient out of their waste. Some of the waste districts are moving ahead and trying to take those extra steps anyway.

 

The anhydrous ammonia issue just boggles the mind. Some farmers will still tell you that none of it gets into streams. Even when you prove to them that it does they just shrug and say it does no harm. The dead zone is a "myth" in their minds...because as you know scientists just sit around and invent things like this to complicate our lives.

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