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Fly Rods


Russ S
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I think the fewer sections, the better. That's assuming you aren't planning on taking your rod backpacking. I'm pretty sure the main reason for the small sections is backpacking.

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I have been told that the latest technology and design of multiple section rods maintain the same integrity as a two section rod. I have a new 7 weight 10' Orvis that is in four sections. I cannot speak from experience........yet.

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I prefer a single-section rod---

but, they don't make fly rods in lengths over 7ft,

Therefore, I have to go with a 2 pc.

 

The 4 piece rods were developed for the traveler and back-packer.

Also a choice for the angler who travels in a compact vehicle.

(The choice of many anglers in Europe).

 

Performance is not compromised in a quality 4 pc rod.

 

There are some decent reasonably priced 4 pc fly and spinning rods on the market for '08,

by St Croix and Cortland.

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Russ,

 

As you can see, there is no blanket answer. Quality rods, by all reports, perform well in 2, 4, or whatever piece models though one might have to pay more for the convenience of more pieces. One consideration that hovers in the top of my list is convenience or transportation. Using 9' as an example. Broken down the 2 piece rod might not easily lay down in the trunk of a medium or small car. On the other hand the 4-5 piece rod can fit into a suitcase and be conveniently out of sight when you leave from the office on that "business" or vacation trip. So that 4+ piece rod will be the one you use more since it is easier to take along or have handy in the trunk.

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Go 3 or 4 piece if you can. The only disadvantage is minimal weight and price increase. 4 piece rods fold up SO much nicer for storage. I got in a habit of breaking my stuff down when I'm done. they have al kinds of cool gear bags for fly fishing. you can keep all your stuff neat and concise in a trunk or in the cab of a truck.

If you fish a lot or need to have your stuff ready you can always leave it stashed in 2 pieces.

 

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When multi piece rods first became available, there was a difference in weight and performance, but that is not the case now. Many rod lines from major manufacturers such as St. Croix and Sage are not even available as two piece rods. The new St. Croix Legend Elite rods, for example, are only made as four piece rods. Very few new rods are available at all in three piece configurations. You really limit your selection if you consider only two piece rods.

 

If are never going to travel with a rod and you drive a big vehicle, a two piece rod is fine. Two piece rods, however, are a pain if you travel by air and just won't fit into the trunks of some intermediate and most smaller sized cars. If you travel by air, you can carry on a four piece rod or put it in a duffle bag and check it. With a two piece rod, you have no choice but to check the rod by itself and fly rods in rods cases can get broken and they make attractive targets for thieves.

 

 

 

 

 

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Thanks for the info. I currently own one rod an 8WT two and also a 5 WT two piece. The first one is about 25 years young and never used and the second is about eight years old never used. My 12 year old son has a real interst in giving fly fishing a try and I thought it would be a good thing if I went along with him. From the little I have read, I just wonder if maybe the equipment I own is right as far as rod and reels matching. Looking at some of the new equipment on the market I feel that these items I received as gifts, may not be matched properly and therefore would only frustrate a learner. It is apparent there is a bit to learn with this aspect of fishing, so if anyone could reccomend a couple good books to read I would appreciate it. Would take lessons but this is not in the budget. Thanks again for your help.

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Is it better to purchase a fly that has only two sections, or is better to purchase one with 3 to 4 sections.

Will probably be using a 5 WT and fishing for smallies.

 

I would measure the trunk of your car, then decide if you want a 2, 3, or 4 piece rod, unless you own a truck. What I suggest is that you see if you like to assemble three or four pieces and go from there. And before you buy that 5wt, I suggest that you go to your local fly shop with the fly(s) that you intend to cast and see if the rod/line combination works with your casting ability. The number of pieces in a rod has very little to do with it's castability and more to do with it's portability.

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I do a fair amount of air travel and will say up front, four piece rods are great. I can take them and my reels on the plane as carry-on luggage and the airport cannot loose or steal them from me. Loose my clothes, I can wear what's on my back but I can't fish without a rod. If there is a difference in action from a two to a four piece, I can't feel it.

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Russ, your two older outfits are probably just fine. Save yourself some cash and give them a try. If you have a fly shop somewhere in the area take them both in and ask the guys there to check them out for you. The most common problem I've seen is the wrong line size, IGFA standard or not, sometimes a particular rod will cast better with a size heavier or lighter than what's listed on the rod. You can get by without lessons, myself and all my friends have. You can find tons of books and inst. videos at a shop or on the net. You can ignore the latest equipment ads while you figure out what you like and don't like, the most popular reel I see onstream and on Ebay are the 30 to 40 year old Pfleuger Medalist reels. Once you know what you like in a fly rod, and what kind of fishing you'll mostly be using it for, then shop around for particulars. Hope this helps and doesn't confuse you too much. Dive in, the waters fine. Ed Wahl

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Is it better to purchase a fly that has only two sections, or is better to purchase one with 3 to 4 sections.

Will probably be using a 5 WT and fishing for smallies.

While ok for for trout or panfish a 5wt is too light for a beginner to cast the flies most often used for bass.While not necessary for a practiced caster,your 8wt would be better in the beginning.Most smallmouth fishermen use 6 or 7wts.2 piece rods are preferrable unless, as others have already advised, you think you may someday travel by plane.They are still available from mfrs. such as Sage,Fenwick, Orvis,under Cabela's brand name etc. and are transportable in the passenger compartment if not the trunk of even small cars.If you opt for a multi piece choose a 4 not a 3 or 5 piece because for those times when you wish to leave the rod rigged up it can be broken down into 2 equal length sections.

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For the Fox River and other smaller and shallower streams,

I get more use out of my 3 wt Med action 8.5ft, loaded with 4 WF line,

over my 6, 7 & 8wt models.

 

I can make longer and easier casts, when using Sz 6 or 4 streamers, or the like.

My 3wt rod handles medium size smallies with no problem.

 

I think most beginners are equipped with too large a set-up.

The larger sizes are heavier, and get the angler more tired out, and quit after a couple hours, or even less.

 

Many anglers are sold an outfit that the sales person likes---and most of those salesmen really don't fish enough to really know, or be most helpful.

 

Most beginner or novice anglers try to make too long of casts, vs perfecting short and accurate casts.

The distance will come with lots of practice.

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For the Fox River and other smaller and shallower streams,

I get more use out of my 3 wt Med action 8.5ft, loaded with 4 WF line,

over my 6, 7 & 8wt models.

 

I can make longer and easier casts, when using Sz 6 or 4 streamers, or the like.

My 3wt rod handles medium size smallies with no problem.

 

I think most beginners are equipped with too large a set-up.

The larger sizes are heavier, and get the angler more tired out, and quit after a couple hours, or even less.

 

Many anglers are sold an outfit that the sales person likes---and most of those salesmen really don't fish enough to really know, or be most helpful.

 

Most beginner or novice anglers try to make too long of casts, vs perfecting short and accurate casts.

The distance will come with lots of practice.

I also prefer using as light a rod as possible and routinely use a 4wt on the clear Dupage and on the Kank when it's low and clear.However, I find that a murky river like the Fox is best fished with outsize streamers and bassbugs that call more attention to themselves in murky conditions and require a 6or 7wt rod.Using such flies with my 6wt produced good results for me last fall on the Fox for 16-20"smallies.

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River Smallies just had a loooong post on what weight rod is best. An 8-wt won hands down with people posting in from many different states. A 6 or 7-wt came in second. It was stated several times and I'd agree that a 3-wt may be fun but no way would I consider it my "standard" bass rod. It's that you just like to use ultra-light tackle. I see why Joseph Meyer dropped out with a comment like that about people who work in fly shops. I'm certain he could fish circles around you and also would not recommend a 3-wt for smallmouth.

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River Smallies just had a loooong post on what weight rod is best. An 8-wt won hands down with people posting in from many different states. A 6 or 7-wt came in second. It was stated several times and I'd agree that a 3-wt may be fun but no way would I consider it my "standard" bass rod. It's that you just like to use ultra-light tackle. I see why Joseph Meyer dropped out with a comment like that about people who work in fly shops. I'm certain he could fish circles around you and also would not recommend a 3-wt for smallmouth.

 

I know Joseph can flyfish circles around me,

he's an expert at fly fishing.

 

I don't pretend to be an expert, I just try to fish a lot.

It's what I like, as I stated above.

 

In years past, I've mostly used a 7wt 9ft---however, after being introduced to 3-4wt, I'm sold on it---

but, it has it's limitations.

 

The average SMB in the Fox is about 12" long---my 3wt does fine.

 

Most flyrodders I know of, or have talked to, use 3wt on 6 - 7.5ft rods, which is too short to my liking.

 

I also use 6wt, 7wt and 8wt outfits, but that's when I'm using larger flys/streamers, or the like, and targeting larger fish.

 

I'm considering a 10ft with 12wt, for a trip to do some fishing in Florida, for some BAB.

 

I select the flyrod outfit, according to what I'm targeting and the lures I intend to use.

 

I'm a light-line angler, and I like to fish with light tackle,

unless I'm targeting big fish, and in heavy cover, then I go with my MH to heavy action gear---7 to 10ft rods and 20-50lb line---then I just wench 'em in, when I get snagged, tree branches, brush piles, stumps are brought in.

Got stuck on a dock one time, nearly pulled it loose from a steel wall it was anchored to.

 

One of my favorite spinning outfits for smallies is a GLoomis SR782 6.5ft light action rod, fitted with a Stradic 1000F and 6lb line. I catch over 50% of my smallies on this outfit---smallies from 8 to over 19".

The bigger smallies really give that rod a workout.

It's the most fun I have, standing upright.

 

I've caught more larger fish on light action tackle than when I'm targeting larger fish with heavier tackle---

go figure.

Maybe those fish think they can break free of my grip.

As long as I'm using Cortland's Endurance Super-Mono, they don't get away.

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Jim, don't make assumptions that I don't know why he dropped out. I talked to Joseph. Because he asked me not to, I won't point fingers at people (as much as I'd LOVE to). But I sure some of you know who you are.

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Again, thank you all for the comments and suggestions. It's obvious we'll have to spend a considerable amount time trying the various rods, techniques and all other variables to perfect a new facet to our fishing repertoire. Tough job, but someone's gotta to it.

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