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For the tyers out there.....


Michael T
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What are your fly tying habbits?  

12 members have voted

  1. 1. How many hours do you tye in a month?

    • Less than 1.
      2
    • 1 to 5.
      4
    • 5 to 10.
      3
    • 10 to 15.
      1
    • 15+ I'm obsessed.
      2
  2. 2. When you tye, do you tye just 1 pattern in a sitting?

    • Always 1 pattern in a sitting.
      4
    • Sometimes.
      6
    • Never....I tye a variety at each sitting.
      2
  3. 3. The patterns you tye most often come from?

    • Books and/or Magazines.
      4
    • Internet web sites.
      6
    • Classes I've attended.
      4


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I hesistated learning to tye flies, because I knew it would become a serious hobby for me and I wasn't sure I wanted to devote the time. Since there are plenty of fly fishers who have no interest in tying, I was curious what other ISA members have to say.

 

If you want to expound on this topic and/or make other comments, please feel free to post.

 

Thanks for your thoughts!

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Most of the patterns I tie are my own, or my own variations on an existing pattern. I generally will sit down and tie a couple differant ideas I have based on one pattern. I'll usually only tie enough flies for my next outing. Most of the time, two copies of particular fly. I've never been able to sit down and tie dozens of the same fly.

 

 

I hesistated learning to tye flies, because I knew it would become a serious hobby for me and I wasn't sure I wanted to devote the time. Since there are plenty of fly fishers who have no interest in tying, I was curious what other ISA members have to say.

 

If you want to expound on this topic and/or make other comments, please feel free to post.

 

Thanks for your thoughts!

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I've noticed a change in my tying this year, after about 5 years or so of tying. I'm tying less patterns and tying more of them. I'm going back to the basics: buggers, clousers, shenks in naturalish colors. :D

 

These days I'll usually sit down to tie 6 copies of a proven pattern. Usually takes about an hour while "watching" tv. I'll tie once or twice a week.

 

Next up: some half and halfs for fall fishing.

 

Sometimes I'll tie a couple of a new pattern. No more than two no matter how much fun I'm having -- that's my new rule. I used to go crazy with new patterns, ugh! I'm also becoming more ashamed of my old ties. Al has seen my trout stuff- those are even worse than my smallmouth stuff. I've got a lot of hooks to recycle! I won't ever make the mistake of tying a dozen of an unproven pattern. :blink:

 

-jamie s.

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I hesistated learning to tye flies, because I knew it would become a serious hobby for me and I wasn't sure I wanted to devote the time. Since there are plenty of fly fishers who have no interest in tying, I was curious what other ISA members have to say.

 

If you want to expound on this topic and/or make other comments, please feel free to post.

 

Thanks for your thoughts!

 

Michael, thanks for this great chance to get filosophical about phfly phishing and tying four bass.

 

I an obsessed because I have the classic symptoms of obsession. I think about it all the time. I do not think the number of hours I spend tying says much. Anyway I do not keep track. It aint G*&% where you keep score.

 

What I tie lately has multiple sources directed to a singular goal. (I should mention that I am coming into phly phishing for bass after a satisfying period of catching bass on casting and spinning gear.) The goal is to recreate the most successful wire, hard plastic, and soft plastic SM Bass baits in phly rod form. Right now I am seeing how many soft plastics I can recreate using Bohemian Chenille.

 

To be honest, I should record that a hazard in the process is that tying can take on a life of its own. You probably have seen the "Realistic" school of phly tying which takes a life of its own abstracted from whether the flies are ever cast for fish. Likewise, I have to balance my production of "equivalent soft plastics" with fishing "equivalent soft plastics."

 

That is a nice problem to have, no?

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Tying for me is pretty much of a a winter activity. About the only time that I tie flies during the fishing season is when I run out of something or if I need a specific flies for a planned outing. When I tie in the winter, I usually sit down and tie at least a half dozen of a particular fly. The flies that I tie are based upon patterns from ISA meetings or other sources.

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  • 2 weeks later...

The winter time is my prime tying time, also.

Every fall, I feel like I need to hone up on my tying skills that have gone rather rusty over the open water fishing season.

 

The 4th Monday Fly Tying nite and the relationships within that group, is what got me started tying flies and sticking with it. (Thank you Michael T. and Ken S. for starting me down this path.) Keeping the group going over the summer was a wonderful plan.

 

Thursday nites at OMC, when I can make them, are a real source of encouragement and learning for me. Joseph has been a wonderful coach and mentor.

 

I also admire Michael Taylor very much, for his ability to creatively tie patterns and then test them out on the water. (I love the Imataylor.)

 

Thanks for this forum to share these thoughts.

 

Cory G <0))))><

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I would guess that over the course of a month I average an hour a day at tying. I only tye original patterns because that's what I find fun to do. It has become a form of stress relief to me. My own little world. I'm not a sports nut (football, baseball, hockey, etc). Fly tying is my "out" in life. Sometimes I think I like to tye more than I do to fish. Of course ask me that when I'm holding a bent rod and you'll get a different answer.

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I would guess that over the course of a month I average an hour a day at tying. I only tye original patterns because that's what I find fun to do. It has become a form of stress relief to me. My own little world. I'm not a sports nut (football, baseball, hockey, etc). Fly tying is my "out" in life. Sometimes I think I like to tye more than I do to fish. Of course ask me that when I'm holding a bent rod and you'll get a different answer.

 

Great comment, Craig.

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