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Felt soled waders responsible for spreading disease


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I found this on another website. I don't know what whirling disease is or if it is present in Illinois, but who knows what other exotic plant of parasite we might be spreading around?

 

Advice To Anglers Regarding Felt Soles on Wading Boots And Preventing The Spread of Disease And Invasive Species

Research responding to concerns regarding the spread of diseases and invasive species has shown that felts on the bottom of wading shoes and boots are major culprits in the transfer of such problems. Research by Gates (2007) concluded that felt material retained 100% of whirling disease spores in material testing; and in 2006, participants of a special American Fisheries Society meeting on the invasive algae Didymosphenia agreed that “felt-soled waders are one of the highest risk vectors in the spread of ‘didymo’ on a global scale.”

 

In light of these findings, Maryland Department of Natural Resources strongly urges anglers to eliminate the use of felt-soled boots and waders. For some areas, traditional rubber boots, or those with studded bottoms may provide as much traction as felts. For challenging areas, manufacturers are now offering ‘sticky-soled’ alternatives, with traction treads like those found on all weather tires. These sticky-soled rubber boots provide good traction, are non-absorptive and easy to clean. Guides and anglers have reported that the studded versions of these boots work as well as felts. They may take a little getting used to, but they don’t absorb water, are more lightweight and may, ultimately, make walking easier. These new boot materials effectively reduce the chance of spreading disease and invasive organisms. By removing dirt and debris from these new types of footwear with a scrub brush, you can effectively prevent transmission of these agents from one area to another. Please consider helping Maryland DNR protect the resources of the State by trying out alternatives to felt bottom waders.

 

Literature Cited

 

Gates, K.K. 2007. Myxospore Detection in Soil and Angler Movement in Southwest Montana: Implications for Whirling Disease Transport. Montana State University Master’s Thesis

 

Western Division American Fisheries Society. 2006. Special Session on Didymosphenia geminata

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I looked up these two and have links to both here. Didymosphenia is and evasive plant that has been around since the 1980's and appeared in Oligotrphic Lakes of Northern States. http://www.issg.org/database/species/ecolo...mp;fr=1&sts

 

Whirling Disease is found in the Salminoid Species and got its name from the fish chasing its tail. http://www.whirling-disease.org/

 

I hope this helps explain some of this.

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Thanks Scott,

 

Though the whirling disease is something that affects trout, there are bacteria and viruses around that affect bass. In the domino theory of things, we would be foolish to dis WD because it only affects trout. We ought to be looking around for what affects bass before bass start dieing like"canaries in a coal mine."

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i completely agree with Mike. Who knows if we could be spreading LMBV, or the like by wearing felts. Hopefully most of us have replacable soles w/ rubbers as an option. If not, I think it's worth some serious thought on a new pair. As I am new to the art of river fishing, I do not and will not consider EVER wearing felts just because of this report. All kinds of aquatic species could spread in a day if you are hopping river to river.

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Guest One More Cast
i completely agree with Mike. Who knows if we could be spreading LMBV, or the like by wearing felts. Hopefully most of us have replacable soles w/ rubbers as an option. If not, I think it's worth some serious thought on a new pair. As I am new to the art of river fishing, I do not and will not consider EVER wearing felts just because of this report. All kinds of aquatic species could spread in a day if you are hopping river to river.

 

 

Then you need to start fishing naked.

 

Didymo and New England Mud Snails (but not neccesarily Whirling Disease) can lodge into the seams of neoprenes and breathable waders and well as the sewn portion of wading boots and the shoe laces themselves for up to two years.

 

Felts are easily sterilized and pose very little danger of transporting anything here in the Midwest. If you're worried, a capfull of bleach in a gallon of water will do the trick.

 

Joseph

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Then you need to start fishing naked.

 

Dydimo, New England Mud Snails (but not neccesarily Whirling Disease) can lodge into the seams of neoprenes and breathable waders and well as the sewn portion of wading boots and the shoe laces themselves for up to two years.

 

Felts are easily sterilized and pose very little danger of transporting anything here in the Midwest.

 

Joseph

 

How much of a threat are the "macro" invasives locally, such as wading the Fox on Saturday and the K3 on Sunday? Is there something unique to spread that would be in one waterway and not the other?

 

How would you go about sterilizing felt soles?

 

Are the "sticky soled" boots the latest "improvement" in technology or are they being made specifically to combat the spread of organisms?

 

Lastly, will they eventually replace the present standards in wading footwear?

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I guess it pays in ways I never imagined to go with the 2 pairs of lug soled waders.

They're a bit more cumbersome but I guess it's more eco-friendly.

Learned something new today.

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every time I return from wading I always-always- wash both my waders and felt soled shoes in soapy water and thoroly let them dry.I do this more for the benefit of my equipment than conservation reasons.I guess I have to ask,Is this good enough to sterilize them. If not I will consider new wading shoes.

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every time I return from wading I always-always- wash both my waders and felt soled shoes in soapy water and thoroly let them dry.I do this more for the benefit of my equipment than conservation reasons./quote]

 

I have always heard that if you let your shoes dry throughly that it prevents the spread of whirling disease.

Other stuff I dont know.

Anyone else have any ideas.

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Guest One More Cast

As for Whirling Disease: there remains only one trout rearing pond (privately owned) in the State of Michigan that have had some positive tests for Whirling Disease. There are no other suspected sources in the Midwest. Unless you wear your waders in this guy's pond, the possibility of you spreading Whirling Disease is remote at best.

 

Wading anglers a waaaay down on the list of the causes of Invasive Species being spread. Bilge water, livewell water, water from bait buckets, macro and micro-organisms clinging to boats and trailers moved from one body of water to another are, by far, the main causes of the spead of Invasive Species.

 

The biggest offender in the spread of Whirling Disease is the one no one in Illinois will talk about: STOCKED RAINBOW TROUT

 

Whirling Disease was originally discoverd in many hatcheries in Colorado. Some of the strains being stocked in Illinois are related to (albeit distantly but don't forget, this nastiness can lay dormant for up to 30 years) some of the hatchery strain the spread originated from. No one will talk about this being the Number 1 reason (and there are many, many more reasons but that's another thread when I'm not so upset) not to stock trout in Illinois. This goes above my bias against the Hook-it-and-Cook-it crowd.

 

Rainbows in Illinois are an Invasive Species, no more and no less than are Chinooks, Round Gobies, Spiny fleas, Dydimo and Whirling Disease.

 

Felt soles are life and limb savers, don't give up on them yet.

 

Joseph

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I believe size 11 felt wading boots are the biggest offenders. So please, for the sake of our rivers, send any size 11 boots my way and I'll see to it that they are disposed of properly.

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I believe size 11 felt wading boots are the biggest offenders. So please, for the sake of our rivers, send any size 11 boots my way and I'll see to it that they are disposed of properly.

 

 

Now that's a heart felt statement. ;)

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Joseph-

I have talked about rainbow trout introductions until I've turned blue.

Basically, it became a mission of mine to get them stopped.

I was told by some "higher ups"- and I quote-"Good luck with that".

 

The effort is far from dead yet.

We've got a little "team" working on it.

 

Thanks for the great information, BTW.

More fuel for our bonfire.

 

If you are half as passionate about putting a stop to it as you sound, we need to talk, seriously.

 

(BTW- these are introductions into our rivers and streams we are speaking of here, gang- not local ponds and lakes)

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Call them "introductions" if it makes you feel better. Stocking an Invasive Species amounts to Environmental Terrorism.

 

The only trout native to Illinois was the little bejeweled beauty of the Char family: the brook trout. Rainbws don't belong here; they are a quick fix to sell trout stamps and placate the Hook-it-and-Cook-it crowd.

 

Keep the locals happy and they won't pester the State for silly, insignificant things.....like access to water that should be held in Public Trust.

 

Hard to complain about the lack of native fish with one's mouth full of stocker Rainbows.

 

Joseph

 

....there is no downside to wild trout

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Guest rich mc

having the heavy rubber waders with lug soles i cant wait to get some breathables with felt soled wading boots. having good grip on the rocks to keep me from falling is more of a priority than the remote possibility of them carrying hitchhikers. rich

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I believe size 11 felt wading boots are the biggest offenders. So please, for the sake of our rivers, send any size 11 boots my way and I'll see to it that they are disposed of properly.

 

I thought I was gonna have to give up my size 12s, but looks like I can keep them!

 

P.S. I got you package today and can not wait to try them out. Thanks again.

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