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Jim J

This is not a political discussion

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Why were they not put into place in O's first 8 years rather than waiting on his way out the door?

 

I had to comment on this non-political discussion. Rob's statement is called criminalizing the victim. We see it often in the form of a question. For example, when a girl is a victim of date rape, we ask, "What kind of girl would would date a guy like him?" It puts the blame on the victim. President Obamma had his hand's tied by the R House and Senate. Can you blame him? There was a stalemate there. At least over zealous Rs could not repeal the laws we had because of his veto. Now, watch out!

 

Whom do I write?

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I had to comment on this non-political discussion. Rob's statement is called criminalizing the victim. We see it often in the form of a question. For example, when a girl is a victim of date rape, we ask, "What kind of girl would would date a guy like him?" It puts the blame on the victim. President Obamma had his hand's tied by the R House and Senate. Can you blame him? There was a stalemate there. At least over zealous Rs could not repeal the laws we had because of his veto. Now, watch out!

 

Whom do I write?

 

Thanks Mike. I was going to point that out.

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What are these people thinking? Can you imagine what our land, lakes and streams would be like without the EPA? Can we leave it to business to regulate itself and protect our environment? We see what happened when that occurred before the creation of the EPA. Organizations and members like ours are going to have to be more vigilant than ever in helping to protect and oversee our lakes and streams.

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What are these people thinking? Can you imagine what our land, lakes and streams would be like without the EPA? Can we leave it to business to regulate itself and protect our environment? We see what happened when that occurred before the creation of the EPA. Organizations and members like ours are going to have to be more vigilant than ever in helping to protect and oversee our lakes and streams.

 

They are thinking about paying back all the people all the people that got them elected.

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" It puts the blame on the victim. President Obamma had his hand's tied by the R House and Senate. Can you blame him?

 

Not true, the first two years of his administration, he had majorities in both the House and the Senate. There are reasons why it was done on his way out the door.

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I don't know why the legislation was not passed when Obama had a majority in the House and Senate but that seems to be irrelevant at this point.

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Those beautiful West Virginia trout streams I see so often on Curtis Fleming's Fly Rod Chronicles appear to be the most likely streams placed in jeopardy by this recent Congressional action. I better try and get there before its too late.

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Coal, so 19th century.

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F Y I

The Boundary Waters Canoe Area in Northern Minnesota is one of the last wild places in America. It is an international wonder that is on National Geographic’s list of places one must visit in one’s lifetime. Sadly, the wilderness is threatened by a proposed copper-nickle mine that would be built directly in the watershed flowing into the BWCA, only a few miles south of the wilderness. These are the dirtiest mining operations there are. In 2014, the Mount Polley copper/gold mine in British Columbia destroyed thousands and thousands of acres of pristine wilderness by releasing a toxic slurry of mining debris when its tailings pond failed. The environmental damage is irreparable.

In the waning days of the Obama Administration, through the tireless efforts of a brave group from Ely Minnesota, The Forest Service and BLM terminated the Federal mineral leases upon which the project depends. The government also proposed to withdraw these mining blocks from the mining program pending an environmental study. These decisions are out for comment. It is critical that everyone appalled by the current Republican assault on the environment comment in favor of the withdrawal, which would kill the proposed mine. Fortunately, Northeastern Minnesotans for Wilderness has made that act of defiance of Trump and in support of protecting the environment simple. Just go to: www.savetheboundarywaters.org/… and you can submit your comment by signing your name to prepared comments and clicking away. It is a simple thing to do to try to save our environment-please consider doing so.

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Good thread and thanks all who participated already. I called my House rep about HR621 last week; now it has been taken off the table (but it was not Chaffetz' first attempt and I don't suspect it will be his last). I will call my reps every day this week about HR622 ("To terminate the law enforcement functions of the Forest Service and the Bureau of Land Management and to provide block grants to States for the enforcement of Federal law on Federal land under the jurisdiction of these agencies, and for other purposes.") and do the same about Gaetz' bill when it is introduced.

 

Will you join me this week in doing the same?

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Thanks Ed, done. Tim, also thanks. I will call about HR622.

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I hate to be a party pooper. Not sure how much you guys follow politics, but things don't look so bright for us now. "They" control, the House, Senate, the executive and soon with the new appointee to SCOTUS,

Roberts might feel comfy enough to retire...AND on a state level a large number of governors are of that ilk.

Yeah. Not so good.

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Well, i am doing something right. My 15 year old son, Max just got home from his speech club competition. I told him about this discussion and, he knew, everything about the "Stream Act", pretty much summarized the whole subject. :-)

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Unfortunately you're right Mark, it's a sad thing to deal with but all we can do is make calls, sign petitions, and march when the opportunities arise. One of the big reasons I joined the Alliance was because I could see you guys stand for something great and it felt like it would give me an opportunity to help out with something I am very passionate about. Hopefully we (fishermen across the country) can all be as enthusiastic as this group here about protecting our resources and keep these catastrophes from happening even if the odds of those accomplishments happening are currently not good.

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Well, i am doing something right. My 15 year old son, Max just got home from his speech club competition. I told him about this discussion and, he knew, everything about the "Stream Act", pretty much summarized the whole subject. :-)

That's cool

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It really depends on how far a person cares to wade upstream in the political environment. Somebody still needs to guard these home waters, more than likely in spite of serious upstream concerns. The ISA doesn't change the world, but with the resources we're afforded to us, we sure do make a difference. I should probably mention the easiest way for our members and friends to do just that......

Bronzeback Blowout 2017.

Guarding our home waters isn't free.

Let's have some fun while we attempt to save the planet....

http://www.illinoissmallmouthalliance.net/html/blowout.php

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Right you are Mike, size matters and numbers count. The more that support the I. S. A. the louder our voice is heard in matters of conservation. The Bronzeback Blowout is an opportunity to have an enjoyable outing AND support local conservation. Remember like politics conservation begins at the local level

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The senate e voted 54-45 to scrap a rule designed to limit the dumping of mining waste in local waterways. The Stream Protection Rule was put in place by the Department of the Interior in the final days of the Obama administration, tightening standards for contamination of water and restoration of streams damaged by mining operations. The House approved the rollback Wednesday.

What It Is: The Stream Protection Rule covers waterways near surface coal mining operations like mountaintop-removal mines. When the tops of mountains are blown up to get at the coal below, the resultant rubble is dumped into valleys, often leading to pollution of rivers and streams with dangerous heavy metals like selenium, mercury, and arsenic. Some form of the rule has been around since 1983, but in late December 2016, President Obama finalized a strengthened version of the rule. It says that coal mines must not damage the “hydrologic balance” outside their permit area, and established a 100-foot buffer around streams to preserve native species. The rule also called for restoration of streams that had been damaged.

What the stream protection rule comes down to, says Erin Savage, Central Appalachian campaign coordinator for the grassroots group Appalachian Voices, is, “Who pays for the consequences of mining? Does the company pay for it, or do the local communities pay for it with their health and well-being?”

Why the GOP Wants to Get Rid of It: Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell calls the rule “a harmful regulation that unfairly targets coal jobs” (i.e., it reduces coal company profits). “It’s just one example of the former administration’s attack on coal communities like those in my home state of Kentucky.” President Donald Trump has vowed to bring back coal jobs and abolish regulations that stand in the way of the industry. “Fortunately with President Trump, we now have a partner in the White House who understands how irresponsible and harmful these bureaucratic overreaches can be,” said David McKinley, a Republican representative from West Virginia. “Let’s get this Congressional Review Act passed as quickly as possible and send it to the president so we can protect our hardworking coal communities from this dangerous rule.”

Status: Going, Going . . .: The House voted to overturn the rule by a vote of 228 to 194. (Four Democrats voted to overturn, nine Republicans voted against.) On February 2, the Senate voted down the rule as well, 56 to 42. The mechanism used for the vote was an obscure rule called the Congressional Review Act, which allows Congress to overturn, by majority vote and with the president’s signature, rules that were passed in the previous 60 working days. The rule has only been used once since its passage in 1996. It contains a poison pill provision that prohibits future administrations from establishing “substantially similar” legislation without the approval of Congress, although that provision has yet to be tested in court. The measure now goes before President Trump, who is sure to sign it.

This story has been updated.

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Ronk where is that going to be? I am unfamiliar with the Sierra club but assuming I am not gone for work I would like to be involved in that.

While the "main" march will be in Washington DC there will be local marches in various cities thruout the country undoubtedly including Chicago downtown.The Sierra Club , a national conservation organization, will provide more details as the date draws closer

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