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I have not yet been able to cast and retrieve this fly so I'm not sure of its action but it does have several things going for it, the double mallard flank, the touch of marabou, and of course the white schlappen along with Uncle Al's hotspot. The shank is wrapped in flat braid pearl. It's tied on a Daiichi 1750 size 4 streamer hook, 4xl and 1xh. Hopefully it should imitate a wounded baitfish. I'm calling this the Woody since it's one part Zoo Cougar by Kelly Galloup.

 

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I have been pondering this fly for a while. So, in the spirit of Woody, I will try to comment. (Woody seems to be lying low lately. I miss his Q&As.)

 

"It is a good start. I see your usual excellent skills with the materials. BUT... this is only the rear section of a tandem, isn't it? I can't wait to see "the rest of the fly. PS, maybe some red rubber legs..."

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Beautiful fly!

 

 

is that what they call the flat wingstyle of tying? looks nice rich mc

 

Even though this wing is tied in flat, I would say that the name "flatwing" is most associated with Ken Abrames style of sparse bucktail-&-hackle flies in which long thin saddle hackles (1-3 usually) were tied in flat, usually as a tail--but also as a wing--to provide lots of movement and to imitate eels, herring, and other thin baitfish. See a book called A Perfect Fish: Illusions in Fly Tying by Abrames for more.

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Alas, while I was out chasin' trouts last week in southern MO, I was able to test the Woody in clear water conditions and didn't like what I saw. For reasons of fluid dynamics that I don't understand, the fly tends to ride with hook pointed up and with the flat wing down or rather upside down as I intended (like in photo 2 above). Soooooo, I tied in a small black bead chain eye to the bottom of the hook shaft towards the front and the problem was solved, maybe adding a touch more realism if you're concerned with needing an eye for the predator to hone in on. Once that was accomplished, it seemed to have the desired action. I do think it has possibilities and will post back any positive or negative responses I get from Professor Smallmouth.

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Rob, it is possible that the curvature of the mallard flanks trapped air, added buoyancy to the bottom, and caused the fly to flip. How long did you fish the fly? I think after awhile the flank feathers would get straighten out and get beaten up that it would not trap air as much; then the fly would ride hook point down as you intended. Another solution is to use a heavier gauge hook. Just some theories that ran across my head when I read your post.

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Thanks Tom for your thoughts. I did cast it for several minutes and saw no change in the way it orientated itself, that is, it continued to ride hook up. I tied one version up and wrapped the shank with .020 lead wire and though it got down more quickly, same thing. The medium bead chain could turn the fly over some of the time but not all the time and it actuallytook a large bead chain eye to really right the ship, so whatever forces are at work are surprisingly strong. It does seem to zig and zag all over the place so I'm looking forward to giving it a shot.


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Rob, try one with the flanks tied upside down. This would make the wing or the tail curves up. It may not be as pretty as your original fly, but I think fly would ride hook point down, even without the eyes.

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Rob,

 

Try a spun deer head trimmed flat on the bottom. The buoyancy of the hair will right the fly. Lead eyes optional.

 

zoo-cougar.jpg

 

;)

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Mike,

been there, done that and yea, I just finished tying up a bunch of zoo cougars. Simply trying to see if I can modify it.

 

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Woody becomes a well articulated fly and adds some girth. Bigger profile, still not a lot of weight when wet. Hopefully get a little more action and I'm soon looking forward to putting it to use.

 

007a_1.jpg

 

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Did you solve the hook rise point up issue yet? The tandem hooks may help, now that you've got more weight on the bottom from the 2 hook points.

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Tom, you're absolutely correct, the double tandem hooks solved the orientation problem. I may end up putting the spun deer hair head on it to see if I can get a little more "shake and bake" but as is, it's gets deeper more quickly. Only had a few minutes this evening at a nearby pond but it did fool a couple small green ones

(and they didn't throw my hook either.....Ha)

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