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Mike Clifford

The Experienced Stream Wader: What To Bring?

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We've got a lot of new members that may not be familiar with the wading style of fishing that many of us employ on our local rivers and streams.

 

Who'd like to get us started and run through the basic equipment?

(Photos and images are a huge plus!)

 

Waders

Vests

Shoes/Boots

Gear bag/tackle pack

Tools of the trade.....

Etc.

 

As an added bonus, if someone would like to work something up for the next newsletter, please feel free!

B)

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Mike,

 

Back in the old dusty archieves is an article I wrote on that subject. Fell free to dust it off and reprint it if you want. I am pretty sure it's in my files, I could look it up and resubmit too.

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If not familiar with a river's wading conditions or if those conditions are known to be somewhat difficult a wading staff is a good idea.They typically come with a rope with which they can be secured to your wading belt allowing them to drift in the current while your casting.The collapsible staffs can be stored in a tool belt type holster when not needed.

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Eric,

Couldn't you use that 16' rod, in lieu of a wading staff, for prodding out in front of you, while wading?

And, if you keep a short lead on the line to lure, from your rod tip, you could just reach down into those holes, rock ledges or the like, and catch a fish.

Accomplish two things at the same time.

 

Also, the longer rod may come in handy to do those "figure 8's", out a distance in front of you.

 

During the figure 8 maneuver, a 6' rod may cause the line/lure to tangle around your legs---

so when the fish strikes and you set the hook, you could easily pull your feet out from under you and go down.

;)

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Learn to fish a tube jig. So versatile and consistent. My first year after ditching the 2" grubs and rooster tails, I fished them almost exclusively. While I found some days other lures are more effective. New anglers need to be able to fish the bottom effectively. There's never a day when I'm not throwing a tube- probing cover at some point.

 

The different weights make the tube jig a different lure.

 

1/8 oz for more of a flutter fall strikes. Summertime when current is slower.

3/16oz gets to the bottom in decent current- you don't want the bait going over the fish's head.

1/4oz dropping into quick dropoffs with swift current passing over

 

You want to be ticking and bouncing on the bottom or your jig could be flying over fish.

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Eric-

I'd be curious to know why the color white.

Does that work on any flow you happen to be fishing?

 

I've noticed the few times I've fished the Fox River, a completely different arsenal is required as opposed to the Kankakee.

Tubes worked on the Fox, yet are never worth the effort for me on the Kankakee...for whatever the reason.

 

I am aware (and intrigued) that different watersheds have distinctly different forage, and adjustments should be made.

 

What, in your opinion is significant about the color white?

Confidence, or something more?

(Other than the fact you work a spinnerbait like a master, of course)

Gimme something biological.....LOL

 

You had a great day last year on one flow, and I tried to duplicate it on another and didn't get a sniff on white, that's why I ask if I'm missing something there.....

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As a newbie, I have found that the 3rd grip rod holder has been very helpful. Being able to bring two rods makes things much easier. I now bring a baitcaster for cranks, topwater, spinnerbaits, or chatterbaits and a spinning combo for crawbugs. Good fishing.

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I fish a white or chart/white spinnerbait, frequently, in the Fox River, and do very well.

However, a "hammered copper" blade, is more productive over other blades,

whether clear, stained or in muddied water.

In muddied water, I use a larger blade size, and swim it slower.

 

I fit the end of the spinnerbait wire, with a snap/swivel, so as to make quick blade changes.

 

Works for me.

 

 

 

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ken i assume the wire on the spinnerbait is twisted into a loop? rich

 

I make or reform the end of the wire arm into a "round" closed loop.

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Guest Don R

Wide brimmed hat

Sun glasses

Sun screen

Flashlight

Bug Juice or head net

Change of clothes in the car

Water

Snack

 

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Wide brimmed hat

Sun glasses

Sun screen

Flashlight

Bug Juice or head net

Change of clothes in the car

Water

Snack

 

How could you forget TP?

 

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The discussion about what lures to use is an endless one. One of the things I carry with me while wading is a "Gear Keeper" retractor. I usually have 2 of them attached to my lure bag.

 

20793x5.jpg

 

This is a heavy duty retractor that I attach to my camera and another I attach to my pliers. Although I use a waterproof camera that will not be harmed if I drop it in the water, it can get lost or I may have to get wet in places I'd rather keep dry if it falls to the bottom of the river. With this retractor, if I drop it, it comes right back to me!

 

Another tool I find very useful is a combination scissors and hemostat. This one is made by Dr. Slick.

dxjy3q.jpg

 

Since clippers are not very effective on braided lines, scissors are the preferred tool for cutting line. One problem with scissors is that they can open up when you have them hanging from a lanyard and poke you. These clamp shut when not in use and the hemostat is used for removing hooks from your catch. These also have a flat bladed screwdriver bit and a pointy piece for cleaning the paint from the eye of a painted jig all in one tool. Multi-tasker tools are always appreciated when trying to travel light.

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Just bought a retractor and hemo's recently.

Problem was, I screwed up and didn't get the scissors combo tool.

It came with stainless nippers though....heh.

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I've had enough wading packs for people to think to think I have some weird fetish for them. Trouble is I hate having a bag in front of me or pockes like in a vest, mainly because it interfers with the rod. So vests and chestpacks are out. I wade in too deep water for a fanny pack to be practical. Also most of those are designed for fly boxes which are typically too small to carry some lures. Backpacks are cool but hard to access. So the best thing out there I've found is a sling or bandolier. Access what you need then fling it over to your back. The good folks at Orvis make this one. It is BOMB-DIGGITY!

 

http://www.orvis.com/store/product_choice....;subcat_id=6670

 

I don't use the small compartment, it is removeable. The larger one holds a Plano double sided tackle box or if you are a fly guy Cliff's Bugger barn. The main bag would hold a ridiculous amount of soft plastic or whatever, a rain coat maybe... pup tent. enough crap tp demonstrate that you have no idea of what you are doing and have tons of cash to spend on it! HA!

No seriously, it's very comforatable and holds lots of stuff, fly or conventional.

Best off..when have what you need you swing it around your back, out of the way.

 

Nice piece of gear.

 

*****

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I just bought that same pack last week and used it for the first time last weekend. I also prefer the sling style that swings out of the way when I don't need to get in it. There are not a lot of companies that offer that type of wading bag. Good room in it and comfortable to wear. A big thumbs up from me.

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I've had enough wading packs for people to think to think I have some weird fetish for them. Trouble is I hate having a bag in front of me or pockes like in a vest, mainly because it interfers with the rod. So vests and chestpacks are out. I wade in too deep water for a fanny pack to be practical. Also most of those are designed for fly boxes which are typically too small to carry some lures. Backpacks are cool but hard to access. So the best thing out there I've found is a sling or bandolier. Access what you need then fling it over to your back. The good folks at Orvis make this one. It is BOMB-DIGGITY!

 

http://www.orvis.com/store/product_choice....;subcat_id=6670

 

I don't use the small compartment, it is removeable. The larger one holds a Plano double sided tackle box or if you are a fly guy Cliff's Bugger barn. The main bag would hold a ridiculous amount of soft plastic or whatever, a rain coat maybe... pup tent. enough crap tp demonstrate that you have no idea of what you are doing and have tons of cash to spend on it! HA!

No seriously, it's very comforatable and holds lots of stuff, fly or conventional.

Best off..when have what you need you swing it around your back, out of the way.

 

Nice piece of gear.

 

*****

 

How do you wear it?

 

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Screw the cameras, cuts into your fishing time.

 

Travel light but have backup lures in your vehicle.

 

One rod is enough for me, less to worry about losing and fewer options to think about.

 

Pre-hydrate yourself.

 

If you are going to do a long wade distance wise and are with a buddy park a vehicle at both ends.

 

Gary Lange is a wonderful human depth finder.

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How do you wear it?

 

 

Click on "Alt View". there are pictures you'll get the idea. If you sign up on Orvis' mailing list, they occasionally circulate a $25 off and purchase of $50 or more. So buy the pack and a leader or a fly to push you over 50 bucks and get the pack for $25 .

I've had mine for 2 years now. Really like it.

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CSI: A measuring tape and a camera. Pics or it didn't happen. It's a Kodak world. 'Nuff said.

 

Amen. Isn't there a "Man-Law" governing this?

 

Since when could we ever rely on the honesty of ANY "man", much less...the most notorious of story tellers..."fisher-man"

 

:-)

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As a newbie, I have found that the 3rd grip rod holder has been very helpful. Being able to bring two rods makes things much easier. I now bring a baitcaster for cranks, topwater, spinnerbaits, or chatterbaits and a spinning combo for crawbugs. Good fishing.

A wide wading belt such as a skin diver type that's infinitely adjustable is a good alternative to the 3rd grip and works especially well with spinning rods with their long handles.The fully rigged rod is carried vertically along your spine and as long as the belt is snug wil stay in place nicely.Years ago when I used to both spinfish and flyfish I searched with the spinning rod and when the fish were found I'd switch to the flyrod.

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The discussion about what lures to use is an endless one. One of the things I carry with me while wading is a "Gear Keeper" retractor. I usually have 2 of them attached to my lure bag.

 

20793x5.jpg

 

This is a heavy duty retractor that I attach to my camera and another I attach to my pliers. Although I use a waterproof camera that will not be harmed if I drop it in the water, it can get lost or I may have to get wet in places I'd rather keep dry if it falls to the bottom of the river. With this retractor, if I drop it, it comes right back to me!

 

Another tool I find very useful is a combination scissors and hemostat. This one is made by Dr. Slick.

dxjy3q.jpg

 

Since clippers are not very effective on braided lines, scissors are the preferred tool for cutting line. One problem with scissors is that they can open up when you have them hanging from a lanyard and poke you. These clamp shut when not in use and the hemostat is used for removing hooks from your catch. These also have a flat bladed screwdriver bit and a pointy piece for cleaning the paint from the eye of a painted jig all in one tool. Multi-tasker tools are always appreciated when trying to travel light.

 

Fiskar kiddie scissors work really well. As far as I can tell they are identical to Culprit braided line scissors.

 

Rapala scissor/hemos used to be da bomb. But they changed manufacturing and the last set I got sucked. They wouldn't cut sewing thread, much less Suffix.

 

 

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The #1 superline scissors on todays market is available from Cortland.

They will cut the finest individual thread of a multi-thread superlines.

I've been using these Cortland NEW superline scissors for over 8 months now.

These superline scissors are used several times a day, 7 days a week, and they're still cutting like new.

These scissors have lasted longer over all the superbraid line scissors I've tested.

 

The hook points can be held "closed", by placing a 1/4" dia x 3/8" long piece of latex tubing over the ends, slide them down to the pivot joint. When the blades are opened, the latex expands, and when released, the latex extracts and the blades close and stay closed.

 

Some brands of superbraid scissors function okay when new, but after extended use, they don't cut.

There are some brands on the market, that are worthless for cutting superbraid lines.

Some cut fine when they're new, but after repeated use, they just don't cut.

 

"Serrated" blades are more effective for cutting superbraid lines.

 

 

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Waders if you wade spring and fall.

Wading boots with felt soles

Wet wading socks I got mine at Bass Pro

Wading pants the thin nylon kind, they dont hold water

and dry quick.

Shirt depends on the weather

Hat, sunglasses, bug spray sun tan lotion

I think these items are needed on every trip.

Everything else for fishing will be what you like to use.

 

Bill S.

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